Carnegie Global Oregon students rap about learning ethics in their university program.

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Comment by Joseph Peppe, ND on June 27, 2014 at 8:32am

ETHICAL TOTALITARIANISM in our faces.

Columbia University husband/wife Professors Richard Andrew Cloward and Frances Fox Piven, were lifelong members of Democratic Socialists of America which was a domiciliate of the Union of Soviet Social Republic. In his book, Dreams From My Father, you will recall President Obama said he sought out the Marxist professors. President Obama credits Columbia as his Alma Mater. http://northwoodspatriots.blogspot.com/2013/04/obama-columbia-unive...

The Cloward-Piven Strategy leverages an Orchestrated or Manufactured Crisis to advance the totalitarian socialist agenda, along with the redistribution of wealth. The strategy thrives on creating or leveraging a crisis by demanding 'quick action', which is the vehicle fo socialist change. http://www.infowars.com/obama-the-cloward-piven-strategy-and-the-ne...

White house chief of staff Rahm Emanuel is remembered for saying, "You never want a serious crisis to go to waste." Hillary Clinton repeats the regime's textbook strategy' at your European Parliament in Brussles, May 6, 2009: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B62igfNu-T0

How do these "ethics" 'try on for size', in our futures?

Comment by David Harold Chester on June 26, 2014 at 11:57am

There is only one basic ethical message on which all other related subjects are based. It is simply: "Does the activity cause offense to anybody else?"

Only activities which can honestly get a "NO" reply are ethical.

 

Consequently it is so easy to offend ones neighbour and there is a dire need to think about the effects of one's actions before doing them, as a vital link to living an ethical life, whether it is by spreading loud music, litter in our streets, taking roadside risks when crossing at busy junctions, dogs fouling the public paths, abusive talk and writing, bad decision-making in "political" economics, failure to share opportunities through land appropriation and over-charging of ground rents to tenants, excessive rates of interest on loans and mortgages, badly placed warning signs for many slightly risky public activities, allowing worn foot-ware to reduce balance of walking/running children or aged passers-by, insults on the internet, etc.  

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