Samantha Sherman
  • Female
  • Manizales, Caldas
  • Colombia
Share on Facebook
Share
  • Blog Posts (5)
  • Discussions
  • Events
  • Groups
  • Photos
  • Photo Albums
  • Videos

Samantha Sherman's Friends

  • Ugboja Onuche Gideon
  • Al LeBlanc
 

Samantha Sherman's Page

Profile Information

Website
http://https://co.linkedin.com/pub/samantha-sherman/50/9aa/2b0
Job Title
English Teaching Fellow
What are your interests and areas of expertise in international relations?
Aid, Cities, Democracy, Development, Diplomacy, Economy, Education, Energy, Environment, Ethics, Gender, Globalization, Governance, Health, Human Rights, Justice, Migration, Peace, Poverty, Security, Sustainability, War, Youth
Tell everyone a little about yourself and what you hope to gain from the Global Ethics Network.
I am a recent graduate of Dartmouth College, where I studied Government and Spanish. Currently, I work as an English Teaching Fellow at a public high school in Colombia. While my blog focuses on Burmese politics, I have a wide range of research interests, including issues of global health equity and Latin American politics. As a Presidential Scholar at Dartmouth, I worked as a research assistant in the Government Department studying Burmese rebel governance. I also received high honors in Government for my thesis entitled “Mano Dura Doesn’t Win: Examining the Effectiveness of Anti-Crime Platforms in Latin American Presidential Campaigns”. I love to travel and have worked/studied in China, England, Argentina, and Colombia!

Samantha Sherman's Blog

The Problems with Burma's Upcoming "Landmark" Elections

Posted on September 9, 2015 at 4:00pm 2 Comments

 

As November 8th approaches, news and commentary about the “landmark” Burmese general elections are picking up. As usual, I have my own thoughts about the growing buzz surrounding Election Day.

Let's start off with some quick background information. The upcoming November 8th election in Burma is widely considered to be one of the most important political events in the nation’s history. The authoritarian regime, still warring with several ethnic rebel…

Continue

Political Prisoner for a Day: Why Small-Scale Crackdowns Still Work

Posted on March 15, 2015 at 1:12am 0 Comments

The past week has confirmed that despite the Burmese government's made-for-export show of reforms, there is still no such thing as political freedom in Burma. Yet, you probably haven't read anything about the nation's ongoing (but increasingly repressed) student protests in this week's headlines. That's largely because the regime has responded in such a way that is threatening enough to stifle dissent at home, but not violent enough to invoke international outrage. This is the "sweet spot"…

Continue

Why I’m Following the Burmese Student Protests, and the US Government Should Be Too

Posted on February 13, 2015 at 12:30am 1 Comment

Over the past few months, the world has largely overlooked a series of peaceful protests by Burmese students that began in November, coinciding with President Obama’s visit to the Southeast Asian nation. The students are protesting the country’s new National Education Law, which maintains close, centralized government control of the nation’s educational institutions and limit students’ freedom of association (read more…

Continue

Burma and the Ethics of Engagement

Posted on December 19, 2014 at 12:30am 6 Comments

A question I've been grappling with lately concerns engagement with foreign governments that systematically violate human rights. When foreign governments are behaving badly, should we engage with them and try to encourage reform, or sanction them and cut off ties? Is engagement the path to reform, or does it merely reward bad behavior? While this dilemma is central to many foreign affairs situations, this post will focus on…

Continue

Comment Wall

You need to be a member of Global Ethics Network to add comments!

Join Global Ethics Network

  • No comments yet!
 
 
 

Carnegie Council

Privacy, Surveillance, & the Terrorist Trap, with Tom Parker

How can investigators utilize new technology like facial recognition software while respecting the rights of suspects and the general public? What are the consequences of government overreaction to terrorist threats? Tom Parker, author of "Avoiding the Terrorist Trap," discusses privacy, surveillance, and more in the context of counterterrorism.

A Parting of Values: America First versus Transactionalism

"The existing divide in American foreign policy discourse has been the extent to which the U.S. must actively propagate and spread its values, or defend them or promote them even when there is no interest at stake," writes Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev. How does American civil society demand consideration of moral and ethical concerns in the decisions both to go to war and how the war will be prosecuted?

Suleimani Is Dead, but Diplomacy Shouldn't Be

Carnegie Council fellow and Pacific Delegate Philip Caruso advocates for the value of diplomacy in the aftermath of the U.S. killing Iran's general Qassem Suleimani. "Iran cannot win a war against the United States, nor can the United States afford to fight one," he argues. This article was originally published in "Foreign Policy" and is posted here with kind permission.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

VIDEOS

SUPPORT US

GEO-GOVERNANCE MATTERS

© 2020   Created by Carnegie Council.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service


The views and opinions expressed in the media, comments, or publications on this website are those of the speakers or authors and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by Carnegie Council.