Oriene H Shin
  • Female
  • Salt Lake City, UT
  • United States
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Job Title
Student
Organization
University of Utah SJ Quinney College of Law
What are your interests and areas of expertise in international relations?
Culture, Development, Diplomacy, Ethics, Human Rights, Justice
Tell everyone a little about yourself and what you hope to gain from the Global Ethics Network.
I am completing my second year of law school at the University of Utah, SJ Quinney College of Law. During my time at the law school, I have had the opportunity to explore the constructs of international law more deeply, and I find the study of this body of law extremely interesting.
Through the Global Ethics Network I hope to gain a deeper understanding of the ethical dilemmas that continue to arise in the world, as well has immerse myself and contribute to the work the Global Ethics Network's purpose.

Oriene H Shin's Blog

Time for an Alternative to Economic Sanctions?

Posted on May 1, 2013 at 12:23am 0 Comments

The one of the greatest ethical challenges facing U.S.-Asia relations focuses on the continued struggle to strike a balance between regional peace and security, individual human rights, and state sovereignty. All are important, but difficult to reconcile the inherent tensions among them. This struggle is highlighted in the history of the Asia, and through the current relationship between the United States and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea). The…

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Refocusing on Humanity

Posted on April 30, 2013 at 6:48pm 0 Comments

Today’s world is a world that has been rapidly evolving from a world full of isolationist countries, to a continuously integrated and globalized community. Technological advancements have facilitated this fundamental change. Advancements range from the technological to the medical. For most, the world has become a safer and healthier place to live. However, even with all of the progress we have seen, there are still individuals who do not access to some or all of these advancements. The…

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At 12:04am on April 13, 2013, Jing Shiyuan said…

Hi, I am Jing Shiyuan from China. I am a junior student of East China University of Political Science and Law in Shanghai. My major is economic law and minor in finance. I'm interested in renewable energy law. And I do care about the environment protection and the mass conflicts caused by energy which leads to many severe problems.

My e-mail address is jingshiyuan8@yahoo.com.cn. Please contact me if you need a partner for this contest. It will be a amazing experience.

 
 
 

Carnegie Council

Vox Populi, Eurasia Group Foundation, and Narratives

The Eurasia Group Foundation (EGF) has released its report on public attitudes towards U.S. foreign policy. Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev notes that, like the project on U.S. Global Engagement at the Carnegie Council, EGF is attempting to get at the twin issues of "the chasm which exists between the interests and concerns of foreign policy elites and those of ordinary citizens" and "the reasons why Americans are increasingly disenfranchised from foreign policy decisions being made in Washington."

Gene Editing Governance & Dr. He Jiankui, with Jeffrey Kahn

Jeffrey Kahn, director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute for Bioethics, discusses the many governance issues connected to gene editing. Plus, he gives a first-hand account of an historic conference in Hong Kong last year in which Dr. He Jiankui shared his research on the birth of the world's first germline genetically engineered babies. What's the future of the governance of this emerging technology?

Trump is the Symptom, Not the Problem

Astute observers of U.S. foreign policy have been making the case, as we move into the 2020 elections, not to see the interruptions in the flow of U.S. foreign policy solely as a result of the personality and foibles of the current occupant of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, writes Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev. Ian Bremmer and Colin Dueck expand on this thought.

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