Kirthi Jayakumar
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  • Chennai, TN
  • India
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Anna Kiefer liked Kirthi Jayakumar's blog post Is there a Responsibility to Protect the DR Congo?
Nov 10, 2014
Suresh Kumar Sharma left a comment for Kirthi Jayakumar
Apr 13, 2013
Kirthi Jayakumar's blog post was featured

Do partisan considerations alter how international law is perceived?

The intricate link binding international law and international relations make the inclusion of objectivity in legal allegiances a difficult task. This is particularly evidenced in the Iraq War that began on March 19, 2003. An invasion spearheaded by the United States, the United Kingdom and their Coalition partners, there have been plenty of moments in the trials and inquiries that reveal a continuing allegiance coloured by partisan considerations.The Chilcot Iraq Inquiry in London is in the…See More
Mar 30, 2013
Kirthi Jayakumar posted a blog post

Do partisan considerations alter how international law is perceived?

The intricate link binding international law and international relations make the inclusion of objectivity in legal allegiances a difficult task. This is particularly evidenced in the Iraq War that began on March 19, 2003. An invasion spearheaded by the United States, the United Kingdom and their Coalition partners, there have been plenty of moments in the trials and inquiries that reveal a continuing allegiance coloured by partisan considerations.The Chilcot Iraq Inquiry in London is in the…See More
Mar 30, 2013
Kirthi Jayakumar's blog post was featured

To what extent?

The reason that most scholars attribute to the “failure” of International Law, is that it is purely consent based. Treaties that bind a state through its consent, ratification and accession alone can be invoked against it. Customary norms that a state does not persistently or subsequently object to are the only things that bind it. Judicial decisions do not hold sway with the principle of stare decisis, as they bind only those states that are party to it. Any source of law, therefore, is only…See More
Mar 24, 2013
Kirthi Jayakumar posted a blog post

To what extent?

The reason that most scholars attribute to the “failure” of International Law, is that it is purely consent based. Treaties that bind a state through its consent, ratification and accession alone can be invoked against it. Customary norms that a state does not persistently or subsequently object to are the only things that bind it. Judicial decisions do not hold sway with the principle of stare decisis, as they bind only those states that are party to it. Any source of law, therefore, is only…See More
Mar 24, 2013
Kirthi Jayakumar commented on Kirthi Jayakumar's blog post Droning on
"Thanks a ton!!"
Mar 22, 2013
Neha Bhat commented on Kirthi Jayakumar's blog post Droning on
"this article may also be of interest as it looks into the issue of sovereignty of states http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2232682"
Mar 22, 2013
Neha Bhat commented on Kirthi Jayakumar's blog post Droning on
"and last, you both may also want to look at the work of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, that's the only Intl. tribunal that has jurisdiction over the crime of terrorism and it has some fascinating jurisprudence in this regard. The work of…"
Mar 22, 2013
Neha Bhat commented on Kirthi Jayakumar's blog post Droning on
"Prof. Alston was the Spl. Rapporteur for Extra judicial Killings, not on drones/ human rights or counter terrorism- his work on drone strikes is therefore from a more human rights framework. There is a report/ statement issued by Ben Emerson, the…"
Mar 22, 2013
Kirthi Jayakumar commented on Kirthi Jayakumar's blog post Droning on
"Thanks so much, Neha! This is GOLD!"
Mar 22, 2013
Neha Bhat commented on Kirthi Jayakumar's blog post Droning on
"you might want to check the website of the Centre for Human Rights and Global Justice at NYU where Prof. Alston is based. If you are interested, you could also get in touch with them. They are very, very helpful over at the Centre"
Mar 22, 2013
Neha Bhat commented on Kirthi Jayakumar's blog post Droning on
"Alston's work should be available in public domain since he was the Spl. Rapporteur a while back. you could also look up www.ssrn.com where a lot of the academic work of Ben Saul is available. Prof. Goldman has worked with the Intl. Commission…"
Mar 22, 2013
Neha Bhat commented on Kirthi Jayakumar's blog post Droning on
"also, if it helps understanding the complexity of the situation better, terrorism as a crime has not bee defined anywhere under international law, much less the laws of wars. financing terrorism is something which has been discussed, debated and…"
Mar 22, 2013
Kirthi Jayakumar commented on Kirthi Jayakumar's blog post Droning on
"Neha, thank you for putting that so neatly. It helped me understand better. Would you perhaps have any reports/articles by Philip Alston with you? I've been reading a lot of Robert Goldman, and this interesting book by Medea Benjamin that…"
Mar 22, 2013
Neha Bhat commented on Kirthi Jayakumar's blog post Droning on
"Kevin, NIAC as understood the laws of wars or the Geneva Conventions is limited to the situation where the government of "X" state is engaged in armed conflict with armed groups within the territorial boundaries of the state- no…"
Mar 22, 2013

Profile Information

Website
http://www.kirthijayakumar.blogspot.com
Job Title
Lawyer
Organization
A38
What are your interests and areas of expertise in international relations?
Democracy, Human Rights, Justice, Peace, Reconciliation, War
Tell everyone a little about yourself and what you hope to gain from the Global Ethics Network.
I am a Lawyer, specialized in Public International Law and Human Rights. A graduate of the School of Excellence in Law, Chennai, I have diversified into Research and Writing in Public International Law, Arbitration and Human Rights, besides Freelance Journalism. I work as a UN Volunteer, specializing in Human Rights research in pertinence to issues in Africa, India and Central Asia and the Middle East. I have worked extensively with grass root organizations that focus on women's rights, and also run a journal and consultancy that focuses on International Law, called A38, with my Brother.


My main interests lie in International Law, International Relations, Peace and Conflict studies and Human Rights. I enjoy art and writing fiction. I hope someday that the world will be an arena beset with Gender Equality, and until then, the fire in my stomach will continue to burn.

Kirthi Jayakumar's Blog

Do partisan considerations alter how international law is perceived?

Posted on March 30, 2013 at 1:59am 0 Comments

The intricate link binding international law and international relations make the inclusion of objectivity in legal allegiances a difficult task. This is particularly evidenced in the Iraq War that began on March 19, 2003. An invasion spearheaded by the United States, the United Kingdom and their Coalition partners, there have been plenty of moments in the trials and inquiries that reveal a continuing allegiance coloured by partisan considerations.

The Chilcot Iraq Inquiry in London…

Continue

To what extent?

Posted on March 24, 2013 at 2:10am 0 Comments

The reason that most scholars attribute to the “failure” of International Law, is that it is purely consent based. Treaties that bind a state through its consent, ratification and accession alone can be invoked against it. Customary norms that a state does not persistently or subsequently object to are the only things that bind it. Judicial decisions do not hold sway with the principle of stare decisis, as they bind only those states that are party to it. Any source of law, therefore, is…

Continue

Droning on

Posted on March 17, 2013 at 1:10am 13 Comments

Drones were set out to be a means to avoid collateral damage, but their practical use shows otherwise. While drone strikes are effective in eliminating targets, too many drone attacks without reprieve can incite several political repercussions: by actually making as many terrorists as they kill and by altering perceptions towards the United States – which is increasingly rubbing the people of Pakistan and Yemen (among others) on the wrong side – in the process risking the creation of more…

Continue

The Slow Climb

Posted on March 10, 2013 at 1:30am 0 Comments

Two years since the revolution began, the war is still raging in Syria. On February 12, though, a breakthrough came about when an airfield near Aleppo was captured by a rebel group. For the first time, rebels were able to seize usable warplanes. This not only signifies a triumph on their part, but also marks a change in their approach – as battles in cities have now shifted to attacks on military bases.

About a month ago, rebels in Syria had captured the Taftanaz airfield in northern…

Continue

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