Gwilym David Blunt
  • Male
  • Cambridge
  • United Kingdom
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Gwilym David Blunt's Page

Profile Information

Job Title
Temporary University Lecturer
Organization
University of Cambridge
What are your interests and areas of expertise in international relations?
Ethics, Human Rights, Migration, Poverty, War
Tell everyone a little about yourself and what you hope to gain from the Global Ethics Network.
I'm currently a Leverhulme Early Career in the Department of POLIS, University of Cambridge. I lecture on Ethics and World Politics. My research interests involve global poverty and the ethics of political violence. I hope my association with the GEN helps to produce a better synthesis between theory and practice regarding problems of global poverty.

Gwilym David Blunt's Blog

Charlie Hebdo, Mia Khalifa and the sacredness of vulgarity

Posted on January 9, 2015 at 11:39am 1 Comment

All of us are shocked by the brutal attack on Charlie Hebdo and the continuing violence in Paris. The rallying cry of #jesuischarlie has spread across the Twitter-sphere, but this has generated a backlash. Charlie Hebdo published a great deal of offensive material over the years. People feel outraged over the murders, but do not want condone what they see as a vulgar and offensive publication.

 

I disagree.

 

Charlie Hebdo is not a publication that I have ever…

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Are we fighting a just war against the Islamic State?

Posted on October 13, 2014 at 6:17am 1 Comment

For the past three weeks a multinational coalition has been engaged in an air campaign against the Islamic State. We've been told the fight will be a long one, but will it be a just one?

In the linked post I question whether air strikes are sufficient means to the end of defeating IS and protecting innocent civilians. This is not a simple theoretic question, but a pressing policy issue. The people of Kobane have been fighting a concerted IS attack for several weeks and air support has…

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Is there a genocide in Syria and Northern Iraq?

Posted on September 24, 2014 at 10:02am 0 Comments

It seem that the international community is coming together to stop the so-called Islamic State (otherwise known as ISIS or ISIL). The airstrikes are continuing. It looks as though we will be…

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"When is Genocide Permissible?" Never.

Posted on August 6, 2014 at 10:31am 0 Comments

There is something rather awkward about blogging about your other blog, but I've just posted a response to Yochanan Gordon's now deleted blog post "When is Genocide Permissible?" The answer to this question is that it is never permissible. This is should be so obvious that no one should bother asking the question. However, it's important to be able to explain why genocide is never permissible rather than to treat it as self-evident. The forensic dissection of such arguments will, ideally,…

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At 4:46pm on January 2, 2014, Al LeBlanc said…

Welcome to GEN !  Al

 
 
 

Carnegie Council

Ethics in Business: In Their Own Words, with Pendal's Emilio Gonzalez

Emilio Gonzalez, group CEO at Pendal in Australia, speaks about the role of ethics in global investment management. He discusses his organization's charitable work, its innovative "contribution leave" policy, how to engage with new technology, like AI, in a thoughtful way, and much more.

International Migrants in China's Global City, with James Farrer

Is China becoming an immigrant society? Why do foreigners move to the country? What can we learn by studying Shanghai's international community? James Farrer, a professor at Tokyo's Sophia University, has interviewed over 400 migrants to China looking to answer these questions. He and Senior Fellow Devin Stewart discuss immigration's impact on Chinese culture and whether foreigners can ever really fit in.

The Crack-Up: Eugene Debs & the Origins of Socialism in the U.S., with Maurice Isserman

Hamilton College's Maurice Isserman and historian Ted Widmer discuss American socialism in the early 1900s and the influence of Eugene Debs, a politician and trade unionist who received nearly a million votes for president in 1912. How did this movement influence Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement? What's the difference between Debs and Democratic Socialists like Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez?

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