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At 6:03am on October 2, 2018, Alexandria Guerrero said…

Hello
I am Alexandria Guerrero, a United States military personnel,I have something very vital to disclose to you,Could you please get back to me on(alexandriaguerrero1959@gmail.com)

At 11:21am on January 7, 2015, Anri Abuladze said…

Please, tell me when the result will be ready of ,,Bettere Future" (If you know) :) 

At 8:25am on January 15, 2014, Made Wahyu Mahendra said…

Thank you fo accepting me to join this group.I am from Bali, Indonesia I am highly interested in the development of cultural education in many nations. It will be very helpful to learn from many great people around the world. Knowing others' culture will help us to understand each other and live together as one...

At 4:00pm on April 17, 2013, Emily Rosman said…

Thanks! It's a print by Jenny Liz Rome (http://jennylizrome.tumblr.com/) called Bright Pink. She mixes all sorts of textures and colors and does some pretty cool portraits of women. I think she's based in Toronto. :)

At 12:57pm on February 24, 2013, raimundo gonzález said…

It is very important to recapture the human security network and to further advance th ODM of th Un of ODM sustainable

At 8:46pm on February 17, 2013, Kathryn Martin said…

I did see the Trans-Pacific Students Contest. I definitely think TFC could get involved! Does one have to be a current student, though? Not many of us are. Thanks for your message!

At 5:22pm on February 11, 2013, Stephanie Cullers said…

Thank you. I appreciate the opportunity to become involved.  

At 9:42am on December 4, 2012, Ashleigh Long said…

Thanks for the heads up about the HIV travel ban article! It is definitely a topic of civil rights that needs to be explored, and I will be glad to do it!

At 12:52pm on October 23, 2012, Sean Martin said…

Thanks for the add, Evan. This is a great idea. Looking forward to getting involved with CCEIA again.

At 5:02am on May 31, 2012, Alexander Doty said…

Yes. indeed. In fact, he left all but a small part of his entire fortune for the purpose of preventing war. Is the Carnegie Council associated with this network the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs?

At 3:24am on May 30, 2012, Alexander Doty said…

I am pleased to be part of this network. What would Andrew Carnegie say about the present US foreign policy as expressed in its deeds? Would he be a supporter of the new world order as it has evolved?

At 8:51am on May 15, 2012, Irene Gumaga Demavivas said…

can i possibly join the competition? i came from a small college in the Philippines?

At 11:36am on April 26, 2012, Aida Figueroa said…

Thank you for approving the event and updating your status to reflect the event information.  It's a pleasure to be a part of this network, and I hope that students can attend the conference! Best wishes!

At 8:53pm on March 28, 2012, Laurance Allen said…

Delighted to join your new network.

At 3:19pm on March 12, 2012, chahrazed khier said…

My pleasure and I'm honored to be a member in this network.., in fact, I have many subjects I want to be discussed with the members of the network.

At 12:56pm on March 10, 2012, R. Scott Hillkirk said…

My pleasure Evan.  Can't wait to see how this unfolds, neat idea.

At 1:41pm on February 28, 2012, Scott Walker said…

great idea and a pleasure to be associated 

Carnegie Council

The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder, with Sean McFate

"Nobody fights conventionally except for us anymore, yet we're sinking a big bulk, perhaps the majority of our defense dollars, into preparing for another conventional war, which is the very definition of insanity," declares national security strategist and former paratrooper Sean McFate. The U.S. needs to recognize that we're living in an age of "durable disorder"--a time of persistent, smoldering conflicts--and the old rules no longer apply.

The Crack-Up: 1919 & the Birth of Modern Korea, with Kyung Moon Hwang

Could the shared historical memory of March 1 ever be a source of unity between North Koreans and South Koreans? In this fascinating episode of The Crack-Up series that explores how 1919 shaped the modern world, Professor Kyung Moon Hwang discusses the complex birth of Korean nationhood and explains how both North and South Korea owe their origins and their national history narratives to the events swirling around March 1, 1919.

The Sicilian Expedition and the Dilemma of Interventionism

The Peloponnesian War has lessons for U.S. foreign policy beyond the Thucydides Trap. Johanna Hanink reminds us that the debate over moral exceptionalism and interventionism is nothing new.

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