Zambia today is undergoing diverse challenges in the areas of economy. The reasons are that most of the focus, time and support has had been given to politicians. And most issues are replaced with political considerations. Instead of  focusing on the professionality of people who qualify in those governmental offices as well as those people who are deserving empowerment.

This however has cause more problems than those already faced by the country.

Therefore this show me the above facts as observed. Politics should not overpower all institution in Zambia. Av Dicey once said " absolute power corrupts good morals."

Most of the time and effort are wasted during the pursue for power over the expenses of the people through by unnecessary and avoidable elections that drain the confers of tax payers monies as raised by government. Thereby, since the collection of tax income cannot be appropriated fully on the right economical activities that benefit and grow the Zambian economy.

On the other hand unplanned decisions results the state in unexpected results whether better or worse.

Finally the singular solution to compat with this challenge in the economy is that which requires professional knowledge skills to override the political attitudes to growing our economy. This also mandates the current government to filter un professional and politicized officials 

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Tags: affairs, article, billy, current, mazyopa, zambian

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