The Center for International Relations announces its Spring 2015 Student Writing Competition where winners are eligible for publication in the upcoming issue of International Affairs Forum, a biannual publication on international affairs and economics.  

Submissions are open to any topic related to international affairs and economics issues. 

DEADLINE: December 19, 2015, midnight EST.

Submissions should be between 2500 – 3000 words, excluding footnotes. 

Please send your submission or questions to editor@ia-forum.org.

Please see our Guidelines for more about style and manuscript preparation.

What We're Looking For: 

Listed below are several essays that provide a general sense of style and substance we're looking for:

Universal Abolition of Capital Punishment is Drawing Nearer

Monetary Policy in the United States and the ECB: The Institutional...

International Anti-Death Penalty Advocacy and China’s Recent Capita...

The Future of CFSP, CSDP, NATO, and Transatlantic Cooperation

If you have questions, contact us at editor@ia-forum.org

Student Award Eligibility

Awards are limited to currently enrolled students (at the time of submission). Persons who are employees of, or related to, persons employed by the Center for International Relations Inc. or serving on its Board of Directors, are not eligible for these awards.

The Center of International Relations Corp. will make awards in a fair and unbiased fashion, regardless of race, gender, or ethnicity.  Writing competition submissions will be judged by IA-Forum Editorial staff. 

Proof of Eligibility

Finalists will be asked to validate enrollment. This can be a high-quality image of a scan of the original letter of enrollment. We reserve the right to request the hard copy.

 

Note: CIR reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to present or not present an award for any issue based on whether a paper of outstanding quality is deemed to have been submitted. CIR may discontinue the award at any time. By submitting a paper persons understand and agree that they will not make any legal claim based on CIR's offering of this award.

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