WINNING ESSAY: Trans-Pacific Student Contest 2014

A big THANK YOU goes out to everyone who participated in our 2014 Trans-Pacific Contest! 

The winning entry came from Salina Lee (USA) and Nelson Chew (Singapore), entitled "The Little Red Dot and the Land of the Free.” It is written as a seemingly lighthearted conversation between two good friends on a sightseeing trip in New York Harbor, yet the essay looks at serious topics that concern both nations: civil liberties, education, and race.

As the writers put it, “Who would have guessed that an exchange between a Singaporean and an American would offer insights on the subtle connections that make two vastly different countries so very comparable.”

This contest is part of Ethics for a Connected World, a three-year global education project to mark the Carnegie Council 2014 Centennial. The winners will receive a trip to New York City to attend the Global Ethics Network annual meeting in October 2014, where they will give a presentation on their work.

The contest was made possible by a generous grant from the Henry Luce Foundation, established in 1936 by the late Henry R. Luce, co-founder and editor-in-chief of Time Inc., to honor his parents who were missionary educators in China. The Foundation seeks to bring important ideas to the center of American life, strengthen international understanding, and foster innovation and leadership in academic, policy, religious, and art communities.

PHOTO CREDIT: Darin House (CC).

Views: 543

Tags: #Connected2014, diplomacy, education, ethics

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Comment by Ferth Vandensteen Manaysay on October 22, 2015 at 12:34pm

Congratulations! Such a creative way to compare and contrast two countries.

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