Winners of Carnegie Council's International Student Essay Contest 2018 - Is it Important to Live in a Democracy?

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is pleased to announce the winners of its 2018 International Student Essay Contest.

ESSAY TOPIC: Is it important to live in a democracy?

Students approached this topic in different ways. They weighed current and historical cases. They applied and critiqued political, moral, and economic theories. They considered the protections, inefficiencies, opportunities, and inequities associated with democracy in practice. And they related their lived experiences to fundamental questions about the way societies ought to be governed.

Thank you to all who submitted essays. We received more entries this year than ever before, with representation from schools in 65 countries: Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China (including Hong Kong), Colombia, Comoros, Croatia, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Georgia, Ghana, Greece, Honduras, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iran, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Korea, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Macedonia, Malawi, Malaysia, Mauritius, Mexico, Montenegro, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Russia, Rwanda, Singapore, Slovenia, Sri Lanka, Syria, Sweden, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom, the United States, Venezuela, Vietnam, and Zimbabwe.

And the winners are:

High School Category

First Prize
Democracy: The Keystone of our Society
You Young Kim
, Seoul International School, South Korea

Joint Second Prize
Living in an "Illiberal Democracy" 
Gergely Bérces
, Kőrösi Csoma Sándor Kéttannyelvű Baptista Gimnázium, Hungary

Joint Second Prize
Democracy: Freedom with a Caveat
Gage Garcia
, Los Altos High School, USA

Third Prize
Why Democracy is the Best We've Got
Alexandra Mork
, Harvard-Westlake School, USA

Undergraduate Category

First Prize
Vote Democracy!
 
Claudia Meng, Yale University, USA

Second Prize
What the Tunisian Revolution Taught Me about Democracy
Aziz Ben Hadj Yahia
, Tunis Business School, Tunisia

Third Prize
Democracy is What We Choose and Uphold 
Mariana Isabel Sierra Estrada
, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Colombia

Graduate Category

Joint First Prize
Democracy in Ghana
Wutor Mahama Baleng
, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana

Joint First Prize
The "Dirty War" and the History of Democracy in Argentina
Lena Muldoon
, Universidad de Belgrano, Argentina

Honorable Mentions

Merry Christmas, Democracy!
Jinyoung Kim
, The King's School, Australia

Is it Important to Live in a Democracy?
Murat Bakeev
, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Russia

image: Word cloud via Pixabay (CC)

Views: 795

Comment

You need to be a member of Global Ethics Network to add comments!

Join Global Ethics Network

Comment by Al LeBlanc on March 14, 2019 at 7:34pm

Congratulations to Winners and all who participated from schools in 65 countries.

Comment by Muallimah on March 12, 2019 at 8:57pm

INDONESIA?

Carnegie Council

A Case for Giving Climate Migrants Protected Legal Status

With climate change already affecting vast regions of the planet, Bard College's Brian Mateo makes the case for expanding legal protections for refugees to include people displaced due to environmental issues. Whether by updating the 1951 Convention or working on a new global agreement, Mateo writes that this an urgent human rights issue for vulnerable populations today and future generations.

Need for a New Consensus

Foreign policy experts are having diffuclty linking the negative implications of a shift towards trasactionalism for U.S. foreign aid to voters. This begs the question: Should there be a clear quid pro quo for U.S. assistance?

The End of the U.S.-Taliban Talks? with Jonathan Cristol

Despite progress over the last year, Donald Trump effectively ended the latest round of U.S.-Taliban negotiations with a tweet earlier this month. Will talks continue in a more understated way? Does this change anything on the ground in Afghanistan? And what is the Taliban doing in Moscow? Jonathan Cristol, author of "The United States and the Taliban before and after 9/11," discusses all this and more.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

VIDEOS

SUPPORT US

GEO-GOVERNANCE MATTERS

© 2019   Created by Carnegie Council.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service


The views and opinions expressed in the media, comments, or publications on this website are those of the speakers or authors and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by Carnegie Council.