Winners of Carnegie Council's International Student Essay Contest 2018 - Is it Important to Live in a Democracy?

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is pleased to announce the winners of its 2018 International Student Essay Contest.

ESSAY TOPIC: Is it important to live in a democracy?

Students approached this topic in different ways. They weighed current and historical cases. They applied and critiqued political, moral, and economic theories. They considered the protections, inefficiencies, opportunities, and inequities associated with democracy in practice. And they related their lived experiences to fundamental questions about the way societies ought to be governed.

Thank you to all who submitted essays. We received more entries this year than ever before, with representation from schools in 65 countries: Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China (including Hong Kong), Colombia, Comoros, Croatia, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Georgia, Ghana, Greece, Honduras, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iran, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Korea, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Macedonia, Malawi, Malaysia, Mauritius, Mexico, Montenegro, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Russia, Rwanda, Singapore, Slovenia, Sri Lanka, Syria, Sweden, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom, the United States, Venezuela, Vietnam, and Zimbabwe.

And the winners are:

High School Category

First Prize
Democracy: The Keystone of our Society
You Young Kim
, Seoul International School, South Korea

Joint Second Prize
Living in an "Illiberal Democracy" 
Gergely Bérces
, Kőrösi Csoma Sándor Kéttannyelvű Baptista Gimnázium, Hungary

Joint Second Prize
Democracy: Freedom with a Caveat
Gage Garcia
, Los Altos High School, USA

Third Prize
Why Democracy is the Best We've Got
Alexandra Mork
, Harvard-Westlake School, USA

Undergraduate Category

First Prize
Vote Democracy!
 
Claudia Meng, Yale University, USA

Second Prize
What the Tunisian Revolution Taught Me about Democracy
Aziz Ben Hadj Yahia
, Tunis Business School, Tunisia

Third Prize
Democracy is What We Choose and Uphold 
Mariana Isabel Sierra Estrada
, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Colombia

Graduate Category

Joint First Prize
Democracy in Ghana
Wutor Mahama Baleng
, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana

Joint First Prize
The "Dirty War" and the History of Democracy in Argentina
Lena Muldoon
, Universidad de Belgrano, Argentina

Honorable Mentions

Merry Christmas, Democracy!
Jinyoung Kim
, The King's School, Australia

Is it Important to Live in a Democracy?
Murat Bakeev
, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Russia

image: Word cloud via Pixabay (CC)

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Comment by Al LeBlanc on March 14, 2019 at 7:34pm

Congratulations to Winners and all who participated from schools in 65 countries.

Comment by Muallimah on March 12, 2019 at 8:57pm

INDONESIA?

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