I like this thought: "Only educated are free". (Epictetus)
Education is not about indocrination or unification of thinking.
Education opens our minds, forces us to search for truth, work with different ideas critically.
I think that an educated person is free from prejudices and imposed opinions.
Thus, educated person is not afraid to be original, free to tell his own point of view, wise to listen to the interlocutor.

"as for me, an educated person is open-minded, he would never judge or slam people he knows and doesn't know". - this statement is controversal, isn't it?
people judge and condemn each other, all of them, consciously or not, we give our assessment.
In this case, it turns out that there are no educated people at all.

I think It's all about standards too. I mean you can consider some people as educated only because of their qualification. F.e., our parents don't consider educated children without specialty. But we have non-standart personalities who are simply not interested in obtaining a diploma. F.e., almost the entire list of rich people in the world.
In my opinion, it is more important to follow inclinations and beliefs, and worthy knowledge can be obtained without institute now.

But let's be honest!
We would be more critical of ourselves, feel less comfortable if we hadn't had at least a bachelor's degree.
I personally would not consider myself educated without a diploma, this piece of paper. It's psycology to consider yourself smarter or more educated with a document, understanding that it does not mean anything (especially if you look at your classmates).

Views: 54

Tags: #educatedperson, #education, #tobeornottobe

Comment

You need to be a member of Global Ethics Network to add comments!

Join Global Ethics Network

Comment by Al LeBlanc on Monday

Emma:  Generally agree with your views.  Seems to me that certain professions and  STEM  justify a formal degree (e.g., education, medicine,law, clergy and (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).  One can argue a good case for a  liberal arts degree  and  a well self educated person (e.g., Abraham Lincoln).  A person makes herself educated, not the degree; education is a ongoing  continuous process.  "The biggest room in the world is room for improvement."   Al

Comment by Emma Mesropyan on Sunday

The desire for continuous development and improvement of skills is impressive. But the text is more about a philosophy of concept. What makes a person "educated" in the modern world? Who should be considered "educated" at all? Anyone with formal education becomes one? Of course not. I think so. However, of course, in order to begin their duties in the professional sphere, it is necessary to fully possess knowledge. in this case, it is necessary to obtain the appropriate base at the educational institution. Especially if your occupation is related to the natural and hard sciences. I think in the case of business and sales, only education (I mean "formal knowledge") will not save you. You need to have soft skills, to be natural in sales. Thank you for paying attention to my post.

Comment by Moussa on October 17, 2019 at 2:55am
Good thinking...

Carnegie Council

The Crack-Up: The 1919 Elaine Massacre & the Struggle to Remember, with Nan Woodruff

The massacre in rural Elaine, Arkansas was one of the most violent episodes of 1919's Red Summer of racist confrontations, but it also remains one of the least-known. In this talk with historian Ted Widmer, Penn State's Professor Nan Woodruff explains the causes and how it fits in to the post-World War I context. Why are people still reluctant to speak about this massacre? How should we remember this dark chapter in American history?

The Individual & the Collective, Politics, & the UN, with Jean-Marie Guéhenno

Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Jean-Marie Guéhenno, former head of United Nations peacekeeping operations, discusses the tensions between the individual and the collective in a world filled with political tension, pervasive surveillance, and fear of risk. What is the role of the UN in this environment? How can we avoid the violent upheavals that marked other transitional phases in humanity?

A Russian Take on the Kurds and U.S. Foreign Policy

A Russian defense news site declared the United States an "unreliable ally" after the the withdrawal of American troops from Northern Syria. Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev connects this characterization to the need for leaders to connect a specific policy action to a larger, understandable narrative for the American public.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

VIDEOS

SUPPORT US

GEO-GOVERNANCE MATTERS

© 2019   Created by Carnegie Council.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service


The views and opinions expressed in the media, comments, or publications on this website are those of the speakers or authors and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by Carnegie Council.