What Does Democratic Reversal in the Maldives Mean for the Arab Uprisings?

Gabriele Köhler and Aniruddha Bonnerjee posted a very interesting piece at Policy Innovations this week on whether the ouster of President Mohamed Nasheed of the Maldives sets any sort of precedent for the Arab uprisings. They identify three aspects of Maldivian political economy that parallel the situation in the Middle East.

First is a highly stratified labor market that relies on immigrant exploitation, paired with rising youth unemployment and disaffection. Second is the effect of rising food and fuel prices on social stability. Third is the rise of fundamentalist Islam, which grew opportunistically as part of the 2004 tsunami relief effort. The combination of these factors made Nasheed's control over a fractious young democracy quite precarious.

Nasheed had been emerging as an interesting global figure willing to discuss the ethics of issues such as global warming. In his 2009 remarks to a group of climate-vulnerable countries, he made an impassioned declaration: "We will not die quietly." It is sad to see him deposed right as his international recognition was peaking. A new documentary, The Island President, chronicles his first year in office through the 2009 Copenhagen climate conference:

Views: 223

Tags: democracy, economy, labor, migration, religion, revolution, youth

Comment

You need to be a member of Global Ethics Network to add comments!

Join Global Ethics Network

Carnegie Council

Gen Z, Climate Change Activism, & Foreign Policy, with Tatiana Serafin

Generation Z makes up over 30 percent of the world's population and this group of people, most under the age of 20, are already having an extraordinary effect on society, culture, and politics. Tatiana Serafin, journalism professor at Marymount Manhattan College, breaks down the power of this generation, focusing on climate change activism. How can they turn their energy into concrete action?

The Power of Tribalism, with Amy Chua & Walter Russell Mead

"In our foreign policy, for at least half a century, we have been spectacularly blind to the power of tribal politics," says Amy Chua, author of "Political Tribes: Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations." What does this mean in 2019? How can Americans move past tribalism? Don't miss this conversation with Chua and Bard College's Walter Russell Mead, moderated by Bard's Roger Berkowitz.

Climate Change, Intergenerational Ethics, & Political Responsibility, with Stephen Gardiner

University of Washington's Professor Stephen Gardiner discusses the ethics of climate change from intergenerational, political, and personal perspectives. Should individuals feel bad for using plastic straws or eating meat? What should the UN and its member states do? And how can older generations make up for "a massive failure in leadership" that has led, in part, to the current crisis?

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

VIDEOS

SUPPORT US

GEO-GOVERNANCE MATTERS

© 2019   Created by Carnegie Council.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service


The views and opinions expressed in the media, comments, or publications on this website are those of the speakers or authors and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by Carnegie Council.