The rights of women in peace and security contexts

       term has varied, numerous issues concerning society, particularly matters relating to women, where the latter made the focus of much debate in recent years, which occupied the position of women in the national and international arena, where the right of rights within the contexts and issues of security and peace, which refer to the role played by women in the military during the armed conflict, these issues drawn up by the general policies of the decision-making process and ensure this through documents and reports the primary obligations of Member States in the United Nations were represented in these resolutions:
*The International Security Council resolutions:
Is the United Nations Resolution No. (1325) issued pursuant to the Security Council) 2000 ) of the most important commitments made by the international community, For the participation of women in peace,
the Security Council also invited the Secretary-general of the United Nations and its member States, and all parties of any non-governmental organizations to take action are:
1-The participation of women in decision-making in peace processes
2- mainstreaming a gender dimension in peacekeeping operations training
3-the protection of women, such as the repatriation of prisoners and refugees to their homelands
4- mainstreaming a gender dimension of United Nations programs.
           As a first step, the resolution (1325) is important and good things but there are 

Fractures and changes and must be faced were:  

1-for the implementation of this resolution effectively, it is necessary to require that the powers and functions of all peacekeeping operations and peace support, and routinely, and protection of women and consultation with them, in the design of humanitarian programs.
2-It is necessary to send senior specialists in the subject of equality between the sexes "gender", who have the authority to take the decisions to field operations, and in fact-finding missions.
3-The development and preparation of specific information on gender equality, and the collection of data on gender in order to provide a better understanding of the impact of conflict on women and men. This is essential and extremely important
4-for effective planning of all peace support operations. Where did not contained in the resolution.

The full participation of women is the right of their rights, they are considered the decision-making processes and conflict resolution and all other peace initiatives is necessary in order to achieve lasting peace in the world.

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Tags: Gender, The, of, peace, rights, security, women

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