"The Living Legacy of the First World War": Carnegie Council Marks the 100th Anniversary of Armistice Day

Sunday, November 11, 2018 is the 100th anniversary of the armistice that ended World War I.

With the passing of the last veterans of the Great War, active public remembrance is essential. Carnegie Council's "The Living Legacy of the First World War" project joins other centennial initiatives that help rising generations to understand the weight and gravity of this moment in global history.

Launched in the summer of 2017, the goal of "The Living Legacy" project is to publish original research on the war, its long-term impacts on societies around the world, particularly the United States, and its lasting imprint on the present. This fellowship program is led by Senior Fellow Col. Reed Bonadonna(ret.). Nine research fellows were selected: see below. The project was made possible by a grant from the Richard Lounsbery Foundation.

In September 2018, Bonadonna and four of the fellows attended the Carnegie Peacebuilding Conversations, a three-day program at the Peace Palace in The Hague, presented by Carnegie institutions worldwide and other partners. They were the panelists for a session titled "Education for Peace: The Living Legacy of WWI." Access the transcript and video here.

As part of the city's commemoration, of the World War I Centennial, the five other Fellows will travel to New York and present their work at a Carnegie Council luncheon on November 13 at 12 noon EST. Watch the live webcast here: https://www.carnegiecouncil.org/live.

Here are the nine fellows and their research themes. For interviews with all the fellows on their work, go to: https://www.carnegiecouncil.org/programs/WWI/resources.

  • Katherine Akey, artist, Washington, DC: "Collective Memory and the Hidden Photographic Narratives of World War I"
  • Mary Barton, Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) Historical Office: "European and American Counterterrorism Strategies in the Aftermath of World War I"
  • Christopher Capozzola, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT): "Merchants of Death? The politics of Defense Contracting, Then and Now "
  • Philip Caruso, Harvard University: "Airpower During World War I: Transforming International Law "
  • Zach Dorfman, investigative journalist and Carnegie Council Senior Fellow: "Chemical Weapons from the Great War to Syria and Beyond "
  • Tanisha Fazal, University of Minnesota: "The Politics and Medicine of Treating Post-Traumatic Stress Since World War I"
  • Richard Millett, University of Missouri-St. Louis: "The United States, the Western Hemisphere, and World War I: Forgotten Aspects "
  • Seiko Mimaki, Takasaki City University of Economics, Japan: "World War I as a Key Moment in the History of Humanitarianism: Jane Addams and Her Cosmopolitan Ethics "
  • Charles Sorrie, Trent University, Canada: "The Legacy of American Press Censorship During the First World War "

In addition, check out the Council's earlier interview series, THE LIVING WAR: World War I in the 21st Century

Image: CREDIT: Roger Butterfield. (CC)

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