The importance of the democracy we live in the world

name:hanane saouli

   university;  Mohamed khider of biskra-algeria

   job; student (Master2)

I often do not see it. In short, because I am an Arab citizen first and then an Algerian or even in European and democratic countries, I am not a human being and I should not apply them because I am not allowed to do so.

And the life of the taste of democracy is very beautiful. In Turkey, for example, there are many candidates for the presidency and many of the parties that are candidates for parliament. The role of the Turkish citizen is to live democracy and to elect whoever he wants and give his vote to whoever he wishes without fear that he will go to a place that only God knows Or the death of a lot of torture. The Turkish citizen, for example, walks on the road and sees the cars of the election campaigns for all the candidates and when he sees his candidate and his party, which put all his confidence that he will change his life for the better and will give him a lot they begin to exchange slogans and signs, Without a smile it does not cost the same that is seen as the asset and only because he lives the life of the taste of democracy.

The Turkish citizen, for example, walks on the road and sees campaign cars for all the candidates. When he sees his candidate and his party, he puts all his confidence in him that he will change his life for the better and give him plenty to start exchanging slogans and signs. The Turkish citizen, for example, walks on the road and sees campaign cars for all the candidates. When he sees his candidate and his party, in which he puts all his confidence that he will change his life for the better and will give him a lot, they start exchanging slogans and signs, Another Zaba completes his path even without a smile and does not consider himself to be originally seen, just because he lives a life of the taste of democracy.

And in Syria, too, for our day if a professor or doctor wanted to give an example of democracy to mention a Western country or any other non-Arab country. She said Turkey's example is because I live in it and I see what happens if I do not exaggerate. Sometimes I am happy, especially after I began to understand what the meaning of the elections is and how democracy is and how to live even if I am a refugee. The Turks see how they are elected and live on electoral days, And not to political parties. In Syria, too, for our day, if a professor or doctor wants to give an example of democracy to mention a Western country or any other non-Arab country. She said Turkey's example is because I live in it and I see what happens if I do not exaggerate.

Sometimes I am happy, especially after I began to understand what the meaning of the elections is and how democracy is and how to live even if I am a refugee. The Turks see how they are elected and live on electoral days, Not political parties.

What we need in Syria is much, but perhaps the most important of our needs was to reduce corruption and allow political and partisan pluralism. Also, what we needed was change in all areas. I saw new people and politicians to see what they would offer us, sparking the Arab Spring. The coalition and the interim government, and much like other members of the Baath party, today, the Syrian people, can not even elect a local council head for a village or even any other position, neither at home nor abroad.

And the peoples that are worthless to the human being and devoid of the soul and the blood of its killers will not be merciful to others. Democracy is a right that no one will give to us, but we must take it by force. What is taken by force can not be restored except by force and it is time to stop glorifying the politicians. And then our countries, the Arab people failure to pursue him even in his career sports we can not live life also taste of victory.

As the director of the political science program at the Doha Institute, Dr. Abdulwahab Al-Afandi, said that the main problem in democracy in the Arab world is a moral problem, 'where there are always conspiring against others'

He added in the episode (28/12/2015) of the program 'in depth', which discussed the subject of the Arabs and the democratic transition 'We have in the Arab world a kind of mentality of betrayal, in Egypt, for example, took place Abdul Fattah al-Sisi coup put a man a democratic project and a roadmap for the country, but after This changed the matter and intervened the interests of internal and external forces supported this treason for the people and for the program of the government itself and put forward and on the basis of some people supported '.

"There is confusion, ambiguity and confusion in the concept of democracy. Some people view it as ideal. Democracy is in fact and especially in its beginnings. It is a balance of forces in which there is justice and transparency. Equality is an example." Afandi said there are no cultural obstacles in the Arab world against democratization "The argument that culture is an obstacle to the transformation of Arab peoples towards democracy is a false word I want to void," he said, pointing out that in the entire Arab world sectarianism was used to strike democracy.

He said that the most beautiful thing in the revolutions of the Arab Spring was that it united the Arab peoples in all its categories. These revolutions would not have happened without the rapprochement between the Islamists, the liberals and the leftists, but the Islamists were surprised by their great victories and perceived them as a popular mandate. In Tunisia, they understood the game. He said that the eyes of the Arab peoples were open, and that the dictatorships in the world would not succeed, and that it would not be the same again.

Référece:

1-Mustafa Al Aas, Life in the taste of democracy, SUSTBOT site, on the link:https://www.sasapost.com/opinion/a-life-full-of-democracy/

2-Program in depth, the Arabs and the democratic transition ... What is the poblem? , Al Jazeera, on the link:https://www.aljazeera.net/programs/in-depth/2015/12/28/

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