The EU and Transitional Justice: New Policy Adopted

On 16 November 2015, the Foreign Affairs Council adopted the Council Conclusions on the EU’s support to transitional justice along with the Joint Staff Working Document: "The EU’s Framework on support to transitional justice". The full document is available at: http://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-13576-2015-INIT/en/...;

It is of relevance because the EU is the first regional organization to adopt a transitional justice policy.

In adopting the policy, the EU recognized that "transitional justice is an integral and important part of state and peacebuilding and therefore must be integrated in the wider crisis response, conflict prevention, post-conflict recovery, security and development efforts of the EU".

 

 

Views: 102

Tags: 2015, EU, European, November, TJ, Union, justice, policy, transitional

Comment

You need to be a member of Global Ethics Network to add comments!

Join Global Ethics Network

Carnegie Council

Vox Populi: What Americans Think About Foreign Policy, with Dina Smeltz & Mark Hannah

What do Americans think about the role the United States should be playing in the world? How do they conceive of the different trade-offs between domestic and international affairs, among competing options and sets of interests and values? The Chicago Council on Global Affairs' Dina Smeltz and Eurasia Group Foundation's Mark Hannah share the results of surveys from their organizations in this conversation with Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev.

China's Changing Role in the Pandemic-Driven World, with Amitai Etzioni & Nikolas Gvosdev

How has the pandemic changed U.S-China relations? How has it altered China's relationship with other nations and its geopolitical positioning? George Washington University's Amitai Etzioni and Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev discuss these questions and more as they break down "great power competition" in the era of COVID-19.

TIGRE: The Missing Link? Operationalizing the Democratic Community Narrative

Does the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as renewed concerns about overdependence on China, create an opening for the United States to move forward on decoupling from autocracies and reorienting both security and economic ties to allies who share similar values? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev shares his thoughts.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

VIDEOS

SUPPORT US

GEO-GOVERNANCE MATTERS

© 2020   Created by Carnegie Council.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service


The views and opinions expressed in the media, comments, or publications on this website are those of the speakers or authors and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by Carnegie Council.