Once George Orwell stated “If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they don’t want to hear”. Furthermore, the word liberty stems the Latin word 'liber' which refers to freedom. i.e. liberty means absence of all restraints and freedom to do whatever one prefers. Apparently, this sort of liberty remains embryonic, and lacks complexity. Thus, such a freedom is unachievable while living in society.

“Man is a social animal formed to please in society” Baron De Montesquieu. Human beings rely on society to a large extent. One must live in society. Consequently, liberty must be adjusted in regards of the liberty of others, so that an individual can fit-in. Thus, the regulation of human conduct and behavior is indispensable in social life.

Relatively, in the Declaration of Rights of Man (1789), the leaders of the French Revolution defined liberty as "the power to do anything that does not injure another." The indicated revolutionized the practice of liberty in its modern sense. Hence, liberty is not limited only to the apparent physical behavior, but, it also includes one’s thought, and word. Correspondingly, more freedom was demanded, i.e. absence of restraint on one’s opinion, and speech.

As mentioned previously, an absolute freedom is unachievable, therefore, certain restrictions must be considered as far as the liberty of the individual is considered. Such adjustment is inevitable so that others can enjoy liberty equally. Consequently, criminal law has emerged in every state around the globe, and it punishes those who infringe upon the liberty of the other.

Finally, liberty remains problematic and hard to maintain by government. On the one hand, the dilemma lies in how to maintain liberty in society in respect of other’s liberty? since there isn’t an obvious threshold between where individual’s freedom starts and where it ends. On the other hand, if governments impose some sort of surveillance on individuals, would that act indicate freedom?

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