The Bottom Billion: An Antidote to the Violence of Competition

“Competition breeds excellence” is a mantra I heard growing up. But excellence at what exactly? Some of the most competitive business schools in the United States have trained finance wizards to gamble on the value of basic human necessities, like food and homes, winning huge profits for themselves, while bankrupting many others. In the weeks following the Haitian earthquake, we saw many distributions of food that were unannounced and took place in a very short time period, creating brutal competition. When people must continually compete for their very survival, how can we ever hope to end violence?

At the same time, many of us are learning that more innovative paths toward excellence can draw on the wisdom of groups. Today more than ever, we need to diversify and increase our collective wisdom in order to cope with the many environmental, economic and human challenges we face. And yet there are a billion people in the world who never have the chance to contribute to the fount of human knowledge because they live in extreme poverty. In Africa this may mean having only a few years of schooling; in Europe it may mean schooling that is continually interrupted by getting burnt out of one home, evicted from another, and remaining the outsider who is bullied in each new neighborhood.

Despite these obstacles, it is possible for people living in some of the most difficult situations of poverty to develop their own capacity for excellence through innovative projects. In Madagascar, for instance... (Read more at: http://togetherindignity.wordpress.com/2014/06/26/the-bottom-billio...)

Views: 150

Tags: Collaborative, crowdsourcing, learning, poverty

Comment

You need to be a member of Global Ethics Network to add comments!

Join Global Ethics Network

Comment by Diana Skelton on July 15, 2014 at 5:06pm

Thanks for the comment. Poverty is indeed demoralizing--but I continue to be amazed by the efforts of people in poverty to reach out to others in solidarity, and by their intelligence in inventing creative ways forward.

Comment by Valentine Olushola Oyedipe on July 15, 2014 at 2:05pm

 Frantic efforts towards  mitigating the ills of Poverty in the lives of mankind should be sustained at all levels.It must also be noted that poverty itself  demoralizes one to the extent that initiatives at times are killed, except a stimulating environment is created by  the State or civil society to stimulate the  demoralized ego of folks that are in one form of poverty or another. However, some poverty situations are self imposed as noted in some African States and not the social structure. And this does not mean at the same time that the structure itself is never a factor.

Carnegie Council

Ethics in Business: In Their Own Words, with Pendal's Emilio Gonzalez

Emilio Gonzalez, group CEO at Pendal in Australia, speaks about the role of ethics in global investment management. He discusses his organization's charitable work, its innovative "contribution leave" policy, how to engage with new technology, like AI, in a thoughtful way, and much more.

International Migrants in China's Global City, with James Farrer

Is China becoming an immigrant society? Why do foreigners move to the country? What can we learn by studying Shanghai's international community? James Farrer, a professor at Tokyo's Sophia University, has interviewed over 400 migrants to China looking to answer these questions. He and Senior Fellow Devin Stewart discuss immigration's impact on Chinese culture and whether foreigners can ever really fit in.

The Crack-Up: Eugene Debs & the Origins of Socialism in the U.S., with Maurice Isserman

Hamilton College's Maurice Isserman and historian Ted Widmer discuss American socialism in the early 1900s and the influence of Eugene Debs, a politician and trade unionist who received nearly a million votes for president in 1912. How did this movement influence Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement? What's the difference between Debs and Democratic Socialists like Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez?

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

VIDEOS

SUPPORT US

GEO-GOVERNANCE MATTERS

© 2019   Created by Carnegie Council.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service


The views and opinions expressed in the media, comments, or publications on this website are those of the speakers or authors and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by Carnegie Council.