Summary of Second Annual Global Ethics Fellows Conference in New York

Our Second Annual Global Ethics Fellows Conference in New York City last week was a great success. Here is an overview of some of the proceedings.

Panel I: Cultural and Universal Norms

Panel I, led by Kei Hiruta, Helle Porsdam, Hakan Altinay, Deen Chatterjee, Aine Donovan, Fernanda Duarte, Madoka Futamura, Mohsen Kadivar, and Zhaohui Yu, examined the themes of global norms, human rights minimalism, individual rights, and the failure of multiculturalism. The Panel discussed the debate of transitional justice and whether justice in society is reconcilable with religion. Their conversation provoked stimulating thought on the global ethic as it applies to business models, universal knowledge, cultural practices, gender equality, legal culture, and political systems.

Panel II: Political Will and Responsibilities

Panel II, including Lyn Boyd-Judson and David Ritchie, discussed the challenge of turning global ideals into practical policies in political systems. The Chairs introduced the concept of the universality of constitutionalism, as well as the difficulty of incorporating all ideals, not solely “Western” or “American” thought, into our public discourse on the global ethic.

Panel III: Managing Systemic Risk and Systemic Crisis

Panel III, headed by Jean-Marc Coicaud, Katsuhiko Mori, David Rodin, and Christian Barry, examined the concepts of negative and positive externalities, economic sustainability, and the causality of harm. In particular, the Panel debated the moral code of ethics within biodiversity laws, sustainable development, and global economic growth.

Day 2: Additional Points of Interest

A central focus of the conversation of Day 2 involved how best to get students to care about the global ethic. One immediate answer was promoting the global ethic on a digital platform. Technology, with the advent of the Internet, allows students from all over the world to collaborate on the idea of the global ethic in one space. The Fellows emphasized the need for their work to be accessible to students worldwide via the Global Ethic Network. This way, Fellows and students can exchange differing perspectives on global ethical issues.

Views: 618

Tags: GEF, education, justice, sustainability, technology

Comment

You need to be a member of Global Ethics Network to add comments!

Join Global Ethics Network

Carnegie Council

AI in the Arctic: Future Opportunities & Ethical Concerns, with Fritz Allhoff

How can artificial intelligence improve food security, medicine, and infrastructure in Arctic communities? What are some logistical, ethical, and governance challenges? Western Michigan's Professor Fritz Allhoff details the future of technology in this extreme environment, which is being made more accessible because of climate change. Plus he shares his thoughts on some open philosophical questions surrounding AI.

The Ethical Algorithm, with Michael Kearns

Over the course of a generation, algorithms have gone from mathematical abstractions to powerful mediators of daily life. They have made our lives more efficient, yet are increasingly encroaching on our basic rights. UPenn's Professor Michael Kearns shares some ideas on how to better embed human principles into machine code without halting the advance of data-driven scientific exploration.

Fighting ISIS Online, with Asha Castleberry-Hernandez

National security expert Asha Castleberry-Hernandez discusses what "ISIS 2.0" means and how the terrorist group has used social media to recruit and spread its message. How has its strategy changed since the death of its leader Abur Bakr al-Baghdadi? What can the U.S. military, Congress, and executive branch do better to fight the group online?

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

VIDEOS

SUPPORT US

GEO-GOVERNANCE MATTERS

© 2019   Created by Carnegie Council.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service


The views and opinions expressed in the media, comments, or publications on this website are those of the speakers or authors and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by Carnegie Council.