Poverty, Powder Kegs, and Stereotypes

Have you ever heard it said that “poverty is a powder keg”? That image has been used by leaders like Bill Clinton and Desmond Tutu in an attempt to spur society to overcome poverty — a worthy goal. But unfortunately that same image feeds the stereotype of the poor as violent, dangerous, and undeserving of help. In every country, this prejudice leads society to distrust the homeless, beggars, or street children.


People born into extreme poverty know very well how others feel about them. Many mothers fear for their sons as soon as they grow tall, knowing that even while they are still children, they may been seen by others as a threat simply because of the way they look. In every country, there are gated communities where walls and guards protect wealth. Children born into poverty grow up knowing that they and their parents are the unwanted ones who the walls are intended to keep out.
This prejudice about violence and poverty is not only incorrect; it is also counterproductive. Again and again, it leads to policies that do more harm than good. … (Read more at: https://togetherindignity.wordpress.com/2015/07/24/poverty-powder-k...)

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