North Korea: Witness to Transformation Weekly Update for October 9, 2014

In this blog, we report on developments in and around North Korea, including the broader security setting and political, economic and social change in the country.

Marcus Noland: Executive Vice President & Director of Studies at the Peterson Institute for International Economics

Stephan Haggard: Lawrence and Sallye Krause Professor at the University of California, San Diego Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies

Weekly Roundup

Oct 8  –  North Korea admits to prison camps—or does it?

Oct 8  –  Man Bites Dog: North Korea Exports Rice to China

Oct 7  –  Interpreting North Korea’s Missile Tests: When is a Missile Just a ...

Oct 6  –  Akos Lada—and Orwell – on Hong Kong and North Korea

Oct 4 –  Ruediger Frank’s New Book on North Korea

Oct 3 –  Going “Behind the Curtain” : Propaganda and Pop Culture in North Korea

News: The blog is now fully searchable for those interested in locating specific information.

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Find the book at: Witness to Transformation: Refugee Insights into North Korea

Please direct questions to Kevin Stahler, Research Analyst, Peterson Institute for International Economics KStahler@piie.com

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