Living with Differences: International Student Photo Contest

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs announces its first International Student Photography Contest. The contest is part of Ethics for a Connected World, a three-year global education project in celebration of the 2014 Carnegie Council Centennial.

The Centennial project connects people across the globe in joint pursuit of Andrew Carnegie's vision for global responsibility—what we call a "global ethic." Is there such a thing? If not, should we try to create one? 

In a world with tremendous diversity of beliefs and cultures, how do we live together amicably? Carnegie Council believes that part of the answer lies in pluralism—the appreciation of diversity and differences, with recognition of and respect for shared values.

Students everywhere can take part in this project by submitting photography that depicts the concept of living with differences.

The photography contest will be conducted via Carnegie Council's online Global Ethics Network, a social media platform for exploring the role of ethics in international affairs through multimedia resources.

CONTEST ELIGIBILITY:

All students of every nationality are eligible. Non-students will be disqualified. The minimum age is 13.

PHOTO TOPIC: Pluralism: Living with Differences.

CONTEST DEADLINE: October 31, 2013

PRIZES:

1st prize: $200 Amazon Gift Certificate

Two 2nd prizes: $100 Amazon Gift Certificate

Additional photos may be chosen to create a slideshow for the Carnegie Council Centennial and/or posted on the Council websites.

HOW TO ENTER:

1. Join the free Global Ethics Network (GEN) website: www.globalethicsnetwork.org.

2. Upload your photo in the body of a new blog post. For optimal viewing, the photo should be 640 pixels wide.

3. Please explain each image in 250 words or less.

4. Include your full name, school affiliation, and nationality in the following format:

[Full Name]
[School Affiliation]
Nationality: [Country Name]

5. Tag the blog post with #photo2013 and publish it. Please allow 24 hours for approval.

6. Entries are limited to 3 photos per person.

NOTE: In order to ensure high quality reproduction, we will require larger versions of the winning photos. All participants must be able to submit a high-resolution version of their photographs upon request (at least 300 dpi at 3,000 pixels on the longest side).

EDITING: All photos must be your original work. Collage, cropping, and use of software such as Photoshop is permitted.  

COPYRIGHT: By entering the contest, you acknowledge that the submitted photo is an original work created solely by you, that the photo does not violate, plagiarize or infringe on the copyrights, trademarks, database, moral rights, rights of privacy/publicity or intellectual property rights of any person or entity, and that no other party has any right, title, claim, or interest in the photo. You will retain all copyrights over the image, and the image will be attributed to you when used.

USAGE RIGHTS: By entering the contest, all entrants grant Carnegie Council and its affiliated publications an unrestricted, perpetual, royalty-free, non-exclusive license to publish, reproduce, display, distribute and create derivative works of the entries (along with a name credit). Such use may include, but is not limited to: a photo exhibit or slideshow featuring selected images from the contest; use for illustration purposes on the Carnegie Council website, in online or print versions of Ethics & International Affairs and Policy Innovations, as well as any future Carnegie Council publications; and promotion of future contests. Display or publication of any entry on Carnegie Council's affiliated websites does not indicate the entrant will be selected as a winner. Carnegie Council will not be required to seek any additional approval in connection with such use.

For questions related to the contest, please contact Global Ethics Network Editor Evan O'Neil at eoneil@cceia.org.

PHOTO CREDIT: Coleccionando Camaras (CC).

Views: 3092

Tags: #photo2013, contest, cosmopolitanism, diversity, photography, pluralism, student

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