Living in a Democracy Is Important

We are eager to have freedom because as human beings, we desire to express ourselves. As citizens, we hope there is no autocracy. With the development of society, as a result, democracy came into being. It is important to live in a democracy because human rights are offered, everyone is equal before the law and autocracy can be avoided.

Talking about the importance to live in a democracy, the first thing is that human rights can be offered. Animals are eager to have freedom. However, different from animals, as human beings, the freedom to us are freedom of person, thought and expression which are called human rights. Ensuring human rights is important because only this can make the society become better. Once people have personal freedom, they are able to discover the world to understand the relation among various aspects of the whole universe. Once people have thinking freedom, they are allowed to think about many issues they have discovered to find out better solutions. Once people have expression freedom, they can put their thoughts into practice to contribute to the society in reality. These three steps develop our society. It is important to live in a democracy because various freedoms can be ensured.

One well known example of the importance of having human rights could be the independence of the United States. People wanted to be free but the government forced them to pay very high tax. As a result, they could not have a proper life after paying their tax. In order to get rid of the high tax and the unfair treatments from Great Britain, 13 colonies decided to be independent by launching a war. After Great Britain was defeated, the Americans had their freedom back, their human rights, to contribute to their country. There were no more high taxes so that people had great motivations to develop economy because you can get the benefits that you deserved. People got freedom of person to build their homes better. People got freedom of thinking to launch a war against Great Britain and they are able to explore the principle of the world to get more benefits. People got freedom of expression to exchange their valuable thoughts to enrich their spiritual life as well as create a better life. Having human rights is not only the basic but also the most important thing to human beings. Therefore, living in a democracy is important as human rights can be offered.

Secondly, it is important to live in a democracy because it makes everyone is equal before the law. Living in a democracy, the law makes the society operate in a balanced manner. It’s just like the function of operation manual to machines: No matter what illegal things happen, people can find punishments according to the law. The important thing is that these punishments are proper and fair, which means whoever disobeys the law, they will be punished. Moreover, the level of punishments is fair to various crimes. Due to the law which gives balance punishments, it is important to live in a democracy. It is like the other side of a coin, everyone’s rights can be protected because of the rule of law. Living in a democracy, an important advantage could be the rule of law, which means when someone’s right is infringed, he or she can use law as an intangible weapon to protect the interests. The identification and respect of law make the weapon useful and powerful in a democracy. The reason is that, everyone does transposition thinking when they are judging. People think that they are protecting themselves once they are in the same situation in the future. For example, when you are judging a theft, you tend to give the fair judgement because you want to get the fair treatment if this theft happen on you in the future. On the other hand, thanks to democracy again, the law and the decisions are determined by the majority who share the correct values. Involving and determining by everyone protects the rights of most people so that living in a democracy is important.

Another importance of living in a democracy could be avoiding autocracy. Just as mentioned, everyone takes part in the society and political activities and follow the opinions of majority avoids autocracy. It is easy to understand. First of all, everyone has the chance to be elected, which means as long as you are qualified, being able to be the leader, you have a chance. Second, everyone has the right to vote. If everyone votes and choose the candidate who won the most votes, most people’s rights will be protected. Third, people can vote regularly in order to avoid autocracy as well. Vote regularly ensures that people can choose the most suitable candidate. Who has the foresight, being able to make the society and the country better and better will be elected. It is important to live in a democracy because of the free election can avoid autocracy and make the country have vitality all the time.

The American elections could be one good example. First of all, everyone has the chance to become the president regardless of their identity or the race. No matter you are from a political family or not. No matter the color of your skin. As long as you show the abilities of govern the country, there is always a chance to be elected by the other citizens to be a president which represents democracy. Second, every citizen has voting rights. They can vote for the candidate they support. Different group of people may concern about different aspects, which ensures the president elected must be the one who concerns the citizens the most. Third, the American elections are held every four years. This let citizens can choose a better candidate to make the country become better. All these advantages make living in a democracy become important.

Living in a moderate country is important for a person not only because the pleasant condition at the moment, but also because as human beings, we desire a bright future. To sum up, people want their human rights are offered, the law ensures everyone is equal and no more autocracy makes living in a democracy is important.

Student Name: Koichi Liu

School: Les Roches JinJiang Shanghai, undergraduate

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