Just Out: "Update on the Rule of Law for Human Rights in ASEAN"

Update on the Rule of Law for Human Rights in ASEAN: The Path to Integration

Carnegie Council Pacific Fellow Francis Tom Temprosa is the lead researcher for an important new report titled Update on the Rule of Law for Human Rights in ASEAN: The Path to Integration. Composed of 10 Country Reports and a Synthesis Report, this study from the Human Rights Resource Centre in Jakarta, Indonesia, analyses the policy and legislative changes that have taken place in the ten ASEAN member states since 2011. It also considers whether these changes support or detract from ASEAN's vision of becoming a "rules-based" community.

The update is a follow-up on Rule of Law for Human Rights in the ASEAN Region: A Base-line Study, published five years earlier in 2011. Led by Mr. Temprosa, a Filipino lawyer and faculty member of the Ateneo de Manila University Law School, the new study first considers whether individual member states' commitment to establish and maintain the rule of law is being upheld by updating the 2011 report's findings around four formal and substantive central principles in relation to human rights, namely:

(i) Principle I: Whether the government, including its officials and agents, are subject to the law under the Constitution and other legislation
(ii) Principle II: Whether laws and procedures for arrest, detention and punishment are publicly available, lawful and not arbitrary.
(iii) Principle III: Whether persons have access to justice as the process by which laws are enacted and enforced is accessible, fair, efficient, and equally applied.
(iv) Principle IV: Whether justice is administered by a competent, impartial, and independent judiciary and justice institutions.

The update goes on to consider what progress has been made toward establishing a rules-based community of shared values and norms and whether the process of ASEAN integration has accelerated activity toward the creation of stronger legal institutions within ASEAN Member States.

ABOUT THE HUMAN RIGHTS RESOURCE CENTRE
The Human Rights Resource Centre is a non-profit academic center headquartered at the University of Indonesia in Jakarta, with a partnership network throughout Southeast Asia (currently in 7 out of 10 ASEAN Member States.)

CARNEGIE COUNCIL'S ASIA DIALOGUES PROGRAM PACIFIC FELLOWS 
By conducting original, empirical research and facilitating educational exchange, the Asia Dialogues Program seeks to advance ethical inquiry around contentions within Asia and the United States. The Program's Pacific Fellows are leading scholars and experts who contribute to a worldwide discussion of ethical contentions in the U.S.-Asia context.

ABOUT CARNEGIE COUNCIL
Founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1914, Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is an educational, nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that produces lectures, publications, and multimedia materials on the ethical challenges of living in a globalized world.

Views: 86

Comment

You need to be a member of Global Ethics Network to add comments!

Join Global Ethics Network

Carnegie Council

Ethics in Business: In Their Own Words, with Pendal's Emilio Gonzalez

Emilio Gonzalez, group CEO at Pendal in Australia, speaks about the role of ethics in global investment management. He discusses his organization's charitable work, its innovative "contribution leave" policy, how to engage with new technology, like AI, in a thoughtful way, and much more.

International Migrants in China's Global City, with James Farrer

Is China becoming an immigrant society? Why do foreigners move to the country? What can we learn by studying Shanghai's international community? James Farrer, a professor at Tokyo's Sophia University, has interviewed over 400 migrants to China looking to answer these questions. He and Senior Fellow Devin Stewart discuss immigration's impact on Chinese culture and whether foreigners can ever really fit in.

The Crack-Up: Eugene Debs & the Origins of Socialism in the U.S., with Maurice Isserman

Hamilton College's Maurice Isserman and historian Ted Widmer discuss American socialism in the early 1900s and the influence of Eugene Debs, a politician and trade unionist who received nearly a million votes for president in 1912. How did this movement influence Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement? What's the difference between Debs and Democratic Socialists like Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez?

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

VIDEOS

SUPPORT US

GEO-GOVERNANCE MATTERS

© 2019   Created by Carnegie Council.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service


The views and opinions expressed in the media, comments, or publications on this website are those of the speakers or authors and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by Carnegie Council.