Josephine Marrocco Wins 2019 Carnegie Council Student Research Conference: Topic, AIDS Crisis in Russia

On May 3, Carnegie Council held its fifth annual student conference at its headquarters in New York City.

This year, the Council received 36 applications from 12 universities around the New York City area and across the United States. Out of the 36 applications, 11 projects, including one group project from The New School, were selected to present at the conference.

The winning presentation was by Josephine Marrocco of Fordham University in New York. Her presentation was titled, "Sex, Drugs and Propaganda: Why AIDS persists in the Russian Federation." It examined the use of government propaganda in the context of Russia's AIDS crisis.

For more on Marrocco's research, read her email interview with Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Devin Stewart, who organized the conference.

As the winner, Marrocco received a one-year membership to the Council's Carnegie New Leaders program.

"The student conference was a truly unique and thought-provoking event; it was amazing to hear and discuss extremely high-levels of research from numerous disciplines and schools across the country, and to have the chance to network a bit with such intelligent and capable peers," said Marrocco. "I strongly encourage any student to apply!"

Other presentations touched on various ethical issues, including climate change, state terrorism, U.S. democracy, trade disputes, gender equality, poverty reduction, immigration, student activism, and humanitarian policy. The panel of judges included scholars from Hunter College and Carnegie Council. The presentations were judged on their originality, persuasiveness, logical coherence, and relevance to ethics.

Carnegie Council would like to thank all those who took part.

IMAGE CREDIT: Amanda Ghanooni

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