International Student/Teacher Essay Contest, 2016: Nationalism

CREDIT: Merasoe via Wikimedia

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs announces its eighth annual International Essay Contest, open to teachers and students anywhere in the world.

ESSAY TOPIC: Is nationalism an asset or hindrance in today's globalized world?

Nationalism as used here is a broad term and can be viewed in terms of patriotism, economic nationalism, national identity that holds a diverse country together, nativism, a movement that ideologically separates a nation from a supranational organization, or any other logical way you think fit, as long as you define it clearly.

Some suggested areas of focus:

  • The growing, weakening or lack of nationalism in a specific country and its effect on ethical choices made by leaders.
  • A comparison of nationalism of two or more countries and how it affects their people, economy, etc.
  • An analysis of nationalism in a specific country in the past and today. Has nationalism in this country changed over the years and is it for better or worse? Why?
  • Who does nationalism benefit in a specific country? The leaders, elites, middle class, or the poor? Why? Is this fair?
  • How does nationalism relate to globalization? Are the two mutually exclusive? Do they have a cause-effect relationship?

You are not limited to the suggested areas of focus but your paper must answer the question stated in the essay topic. 

CONTEST REQUIREMENTS:

  • Style: Op-ed style (not academic, footnoted papers)
  • Length: 1,000 to 1,500 words
  • Format: Blog post on www.globalethicsnetwork.org. English language entries only.
  • Limit: One entry per person.

This competition is open to teachers and students of all nationalities. 
For more detailed contest guidelines, please click here.

WHO IS ELIGIBLE?

All teachers, at whatever level, are eligible. 

All students, from high school students through graduate students, are eligible. Non-students are automatically disqualified. 

Collaborative essays between students and teachers are welcome.

Previous winners and honorable mentions are not eligible.

HOW TO ENTER:

1. Join the free Global Ethics Network (GEN) website: www.globalethicsnetwork.org.

2. Post your essay in the blog section and tag it with #essaycontest2016.

3. Please include the following:

* Your full name.

* The name of your school.

* Indicate whether you are a teacher or a student, and at what level (high school, undergraduate, graduate).

COMPETITION DEADLINE: December 31, 2016

PRIZES:

The essays are judged in three categories: teachers and graduate students; undergraduate students; and high school students.  

1st prize: $250 Amazon Gift Certificate

2nd prize:
 $150 Amazon Gift Certificate 


3rd prize:
 $75 Amazon Gift Certificate

Read More: EducationGlobalizationInternational RelationsGlobal

Views: 5416

Tags: #essaycontest2016, contest, education

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Comment by Carnegie Council on February 18, 2017 at 12:33pm

We will post the results next week.

Comment by Kabita Regmi on February 17, 2017 at 12:50pm
when will be the result publish of it??

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