International Student Photo Contest, 2017: Climate Change

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs announces its fifth annual International Student Photography Contest.

This year's topic is Climate Change: Send us your photos that show examples of climate change OR examples of combating or adapting to climate change.

The contest will be conducted on Carnegie Council's Global Ethics Network, our social media platform for exploring the role of ethics in international relations. Check out previous winners on this theme and see below for details on how to participate.

ELIGIBILITY: All students of every nationality are eligible. Non-students will be disqualified. The minimum age is 13.

TOPIC: Climate Change: Send us your photos that show examples of climate change OR examples of combating or adapting to climate change.

DEADLINE: December 31, 2017

PRIZES:

1st prize:$200 Amazon Gift Certificate

2nd prize (two): $100 Amazon Gift Certificate

Winning photos may be posted on other Carnegie Council websites.

HOW TO ENTER:

1. Join the free Global Ethics Network (GEN) website: www.globalethicsnetwork.org.

2. Upload your photo in the photo section of the website.

3. Please explain each image in 250 words or less.

4. Include your full name, school affiliation, and nationality in the following format:

[Full Name]
[School Affiliation]
Nationality: [Country Name]

5. Tag the blog post with #photo2017 and publish it. Please allow 24 hours for approval.

6. Entries are limited to 3 photos per person.

NOTE: In order to ensure high quality reproduction, we will require larger versions of the winning photos. All participants must be able to submit a high-resolution version of their photographs upon request (at least 300 dpi at 3,000 pixels on the longest side).

EDITING: All photos must be your original work. Collage, cropping, and use of software such as Photoshop is permitted.

COPYRIGHT: By entering the contest, you acknowledge that the submitted photo is an original work created solely by you, that the photo does not violate, plagiarize or infringe on the copyrights, trademarks, database, moral rights, rights of privacy/publicity or intellectual property rights of any person or entity, and that no other party has any right, title, claim, or interest in the photo.You will retain all copyrights over the image, and the image will be attributed to you when used.

USAGE RIGHTS: By entering the contest, all entrants grant Carnegie Council and its affiliated publications an unrestricted, perpetual, royalty-free, non-exclusive license to publish, reproduce, display, distribute and create derivative works of the entries (along with a name credit). Such use may include, but is not limited to: a photo exhibit or slideshow featuring selected images from the contest; use for illustration purposes on the Carnegie Council website, in online or print versions of Ethics & International Affairs, as well as any future Carnegie Council publications; and promotion of future contests. Display or publication of any entry on Carnegie Council's affiliated websites does not indicate the entrant will be selected as a winner. Carnegie Council will not be required to seek any additional approval in connection with such use.

Image - Iceland. CREDIT: Dan Gold via Unsplash.

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