International Student Essay Contest, 2019: Internet Responsibility

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs announces its 11th annual International Student Essay Contest, open to students of all nationalities anywhere in the world.

ESSAY TOPIC: Is there an ethical responsibility to regulate the Internet? If so, why and to what extent? If not, why not?

Please include in your analysis an explanation (in your own words) of "responsibility" and what it means to "regulate" the Internet. Your essay should consider at least one specific issue or area where "regulation" (as you define it) might be considered. For example, you may choose to address censorship, Internet accessibility, net neutrality, social media, cyber security, or other Internet-related issues. You are not limited to the aforementioned choices when discussing regulation.

Essays must identify the actor(s) that should or should not be responsible for Internet regulation. This can include international organizations, governments, corporations, online communities, and/or individuals. You are not limited to these examples when discussing actors, and you may choose to specify an agency, organization, etc. related to the particular issue you are considering.

CONTEST REQUIREMENTS:

  • Style: Persuasive, op-ed style (not academic, no footnotes)
  • Length: 1,000 to 1,500 words
  • Format: Essays can be submitted in .doc, .docx, .pdf, or .txt format. English language entries only.
  • Limit: One entry per person.

For sample essays, have a look at last year's winners here.

Before submitting your essay, please review these plagiarism guidelines to ensure that your work is original and properly cited. All essays will be screened using plagiarism-detecting software.

WHO IS ELIGIBLE?

All students, from high school students through graduate students, are eligible. Non-students are automatically disqualified.

Previous winners and honorable mentions are not eligible.

HOW TO ENTER:

Please email your essay as an attachment to contests@cceia.org.

On the first page of the essay and in the body of your email, please include:

  • Your full name;
  • The name of your school;
  • What level of student you are (high school, undergraduate, graduate).

COMPETITION DEADLINE: October 16, 2019

The essays are judged in three categories: high school students; undergraduate students; and graduate students.

PRIZES:

  • 1st place: $300 Amazon Gift Certificate

    2nd place: $150 Amazon Gift Certificate 


    3rd place: $75 Amazon Gift Certificate

Winning essays will be published on CarnegieCouncil.org.

IMAGE CREDIT: Geralt via Pixabay (CC)

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