International Student Essay Contest, 2018: Is it Important to Live in a Democracy?

Word cloud via Pixabay (CC)

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs announces its tenth annual International Essay Contest, open to students of all nationalities anywhere in the world.

ESSAY TOPIC: Is it important to live in a democracy?

The essay should include a definition/explanation of the concept of democracy (written in your own words) and then explain why democracy is or is not important.

CONTEST REQUIREMENTS:

  • Style: Op-ed style (not academic, footnoted papers)
  • Length: 1,000 to 1,500 words
  • Format: Blog post on www.globalethicsnetwork.org. English language entries only.
  • Limit: One entry per person.

For sample essays, have a look at last year's winners here.

Before submitting your essay, please review these plagiarism guidelines to ensure that your work is original and properly cited. All essays will be screened using plagiarism-detecting software.

WHO IS ELIGIBLE?

All students, from high school students through graduate students, are eligible. Non-students are automatically disqualified. 

Previous winners and honorable mentions are not eligible.

HOW TO ENTER:

1. Join the free Global Ethics Network (GEN) website: www.globalethicsnetwork.org.

2. Post your essay in the blog section and tag it with #essaycontest2018.

3. Please include the following:

* Your full name.

* The name of your school.

* Indicate what level of student you are (high school, undergraduate, graduate).

COMPETITION DEADLINE: December 31, 2018

PRIZES:

The essays are judged in three categories: graduate students; undergraduate students; and high school students.

1st prize: $300 Amazon Gift Certificate

2nd prize:
 $150 Amazon Gift Certificate 


3rd prize:
 $75 Amazon Gift Certificate

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Views: 3711

Tags: #essaycontest2018

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Comment by Mike Amon Masamvu on March 10, 2019 at 1:17pm

We are still waiting for the results. They should be out by now judging with with what you promised us.

Comment by Ayesha Jalil on March 9, 2019 at 9:34pm

When will the results to this competition be out?Kindly tell.

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