India's National Security Adviser Makes it Tough for Terrorists

While India is fighting a tough battle in Kashmir Valley India's sharpest Spy and National Security Adviser whose is brain behind nabbing terrorists in valley has successfully managed world support for India in its fight against terror outfits.He is such a sharp man that he has even brought China on table which till very recently was opposing India's stand on terrors. On 26 September 2018 the participated in a meeting focusing on the issue of threat posed by terrorism, including Daesh/ISIS, to regional and global peace, security and stability and brought NSAs/Secretaries to the National Security Council/ Deputy Minister of Security from Afghanistan, China, Iran and Russia.

 

The meeting provided an opportunity for exchange of views on the issue of terrorism and ways and means to cooperate for effectively dealing with this menace. NSA articulated India’s abiding commitment to partner in bilateral, regional and global forums for tackling the scourge of terrorism which poses a huge threat to the entire humanity. NSA highlighted the need to not make a distinction between good and bad terrorism; greater cooperation, including through information sharing for disrupting support mechanisms such as training, financing and supply of weapons; need for disrupting cross-border movement of terrorists; and isolating those who support and sponsor terrorism.

The terrorist violence in Afghanistan was rejected unequivocally. Support was expressed to assist the Government and defence forces of Afghanistan to deal with terrorist groups and narcotics smuggling; and to assist in reconstruction and economic development of Afghanistan. Importance was attached to promoting peace and reconciliation in Afghanistan which was Afghan-led, Afghan owned and Afghan-controlled.

During his visit, NSA had separate bilateral meetings with his counterparts from Iran, Russia and Afghanistan on issues of bilateral mutual interest making India's stand clear in valley and Kashmir as integral part of India. Other countries supported his point of view. Perhaps India has one of the finest Security Adviser in contemporary time which Prime Minister Modi has brought in his team.

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