How Can the U.S. and Asia Work Together? Two Proposals from Winners of Carnegie Council's Student Trans-Pacific Contest

Clockwise from top left: Joel Alexander, Sophie Site Jia , Paolo Zabala Alfar, Nubia PenaClockwise from top left: Joel Alexander, Sophie Site Jia , Paolo Zabala Alfar, Nubia Pena

In the third Trans-Pacific Student Contest, Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs challenged American and East Asian students to partner together and submit a joint essay or video to answer this question:

What is the future of U.S.-Asia relations or of the United States and one of the Asian countries participating in this contest? Please use specific examples or stories to illustrate your points.

This year, two essays tied for first place:

"There are so many ways that the United States and Asia can work together, but they are often overlooked," said Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Devin Stewart. "We were delighted to receive these constructive ideas from the four essayists, and the judges were unanimous in pronouncing them the winners."

This contest is part of Ethics for a Connected World, a multi-year global education project to mark the Council's 2014 Centennial. The winners will receive a trip to New York City to attend the Council Global Ethics Network Annual Meeting in October 2015 and will give a presentation on their work.

The contest was made possible by a generous grant from the Henry Luce Foundation, established in 1936 by the late Henry R. Luce, co-founder and editor-in-chief of Time Inc., to honor his parents who were missionary educators in China. The Foundation seeks to bring important ideas to the center of American life, strengthen international understanding, and foster innovation and leadership in academic, policy, religious, and art communities.

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is an educational, nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that produces lectures, publications, and multimedia materials on the ethical challenges of living in a globalized world.

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