Ethics and Climate Change: Earth Day 2019

"The people of the 1940s could have left the Nazis for the people of the 1960s to deal with, but that would have meant leaving a political cancer that could worsen without limit. It is up to us to draw the line beyond which climate change cannot pass."
Henry Shue, "Tackling Climate Change: Why Us Now?"

In honor of Earth Day, April 22, 2019, Carnegie Council presents a selection of materials from the past year on the ethical responsibilities and challenges of coping with climate change.


ETHICS AND CLIMATE CHANGE

Ethical Implications of Climate Change for Education 
Brian Mateo, 
Bard College and Carnegie Council
"While [climate change] will affect those already disadvantaged the most severely, even when education is accessible we are beginning to see the impacts of climate change having negative effects on academic learning and achievement, gender disparities, and future economic growth." (Carnegie Ethics Online article, April 2019)

Climate Change and Competing Ethical Visions
Nikolas K. Gvosdev, U.S. Naval War College and Carnegie Council
The prevailing narrative in the fight against climate change is that we must adopt more cooperative efforts to help vulnerable populations. But what if, instead of this collective approach, countering climate change turns into a zero-sum game for nation-states? (Blog post, March 2019)

Tackling Climate Change: Why Us Now?
Henry Shue, University of Oxford
We are the pivotal generation, writes Shue, and acting now is not only a matter of self-interest but also of our unique moral responsibility. "It is up to us to draw the line beyond which climate change cannot pass." (Ethics & International Affairs journal, online exclusive, February 2019)

Climate Change Mitigation & Governance
Janos Pasztor,
 Carnegie Climate Geoengineering Governance Initiative (C2G2); Alex Woodson, Carnegie Council 
As activists, politicians, and environmentalists come to terms with a dire report on global warming from the UN's IPCC, Pasztor remains focused on the governance of the potential use of climate change "mitigation" technologies. What do these discussions look like in China? What do smaller countries think? And how challenging is it that climate change remains a political divisive issue in the U.S.? (Global Ethics Weekly podcast, November 2018)

Climate Change and the Power to Act: An Ethical Approach for Practi...
Robyn Eckersley, University of Melbourne; Ronny Jumeau, Permanent Representative to the United Nations and Ambassador for Climate Change, Republic of Seychelles (Tanzania, Seychelles); Darrel Moellendorf, Goethe University, Frankfurt; and Suma Peesapati, Peesapati Law and Communities for a Better Environment 
How we can advance climate justice globally and locally in the years ahead? These video clips summarize the participants' comments made as part of a roundtable hosted by the Council's journal, Ethics & International Affairs, at the International Studies Association’s Annual Convention. (April 2018)


CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE PHILIPPINES

Resources Resulting from Climate Change Research Delegation to the ... 
How is the encroaching threat of climate change reshaping culture, politics, and even faith in the Philippines? How can the claim of economic prosperity be reconciled with the equally valid claim of sustainability and conservation? How can the way Filipinos are coping with extreme climate change-related weather and disasters inform the rest of the world about response and resilience? Explore these fascinating articles, videos, and podcasts resulting from a Carnegie Council delegation to Manila. (Asia Dialogues Research Delegation led by Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart, October 2018)


CLASSROOM RESOURCES

Moral Leadership and the Environment: Who is Responsible for Protec...
Designed for high school and above, these resources include:

  • A PowerPoint lesson that allows students to evaluate and discuss why environmental protection is a moral/social justice issue, using the Flint Water Crisis as a case study.
  • Links to basic information on climate change.
  • Activities inspired by talks at Carnegie Council that focus on how climate change is addressed.

image: Spring. CREDIT: Ibinic (CC)

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Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency, with Larry Diamond

Larry Diamond's core argument is stark: the defense and advancement of democratic ideals relies on U.S. global leadership. If the U.S. does not reclaim its traditional place as the keystone of democracy, today's authoritarian trend could become a tsunami that could provide an opening for Vladimir Putin, Xi Jinping, and their admirers to turn the 21st century into a dark time of surging authoritarianism.

Global Ethics Weekly: Foreign Policy & the 2020 Democratic Candidates, with Nikolas Gvosdev

Will Joe Biden's "restorationist" foreign policy resonate with voters? What would a "progressive" approach to international relations look like for Elizabeth Warren or Bernie Sanders? What role will foreign policy play in the 2020 Election? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev looks at these questions and more as he and host Alex Woodson discuss a crowded 2020 Democratic primary field.

The Crack-Up: A Hundred Years of Student Protests in China, with Jeffrey Wasserstrom

In the latest "Crack-Up" podcast, China expert Jeffrey Wasserstrom discusses the rich history of Chinese student protests. From the May Fourth movement in 1919 to Tiananmen Square in 1989 to today's mass demonstrations in Hong Kong, what are the threads that tie these moments together? Don't miss this fascinating talk, which also touches on Woodrow Wilson, the Russian Revolution, and a young Mao Zedong.

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