Brody Rinehart

Charlotte High School

High school, 10th grade

    According to Roosevelt, to waste, to destroy our natural resources, to skin and exhaust the land instead of using it so as to increase its usefulness, will result in undermining in the days of our children the very prosperity which we ought by right to hand down to them amplified and developed. If the world keeps going on depleting the natural resources, then the worlds rainforests will vanish, as well as the worlds supply of fossil fuels, and our planet's fresh water.

Trees, huge trees and large forests at one time covered the earth. Then humans happened. In America and plenty of other countries, there were forests across the continent. For example, in America when the english settled, they needed homes to build and ground to farm. So, what did they do? The English settlers cut down all the trees they needed, just like in today’s world. The huge difference is that nowadays, we are not just cutting down patches of forests, but instead we are cutting the whole forest down. With cutting the whole forest down, we are creating many problems. One of those problems is erosion. Erosion may not sound like that big of deal, except that it is one of the main reasons landslides happen. Ever heard of the American dust bowl that happened in the 1940’s? It all happened because the farmers in Oklahoma uprooted and took out all of the prairie grasses and others of the like. In doing so the grass that anchored the soil was gone, therefore, there was nothing keeping it down which then caused erosion. The erosion process made made the top soil easily movable. Thus, the soil was carried by the high winds of the several states affected. It then traveled very long distances and caused major problems like: low visibility, major static electricity, animals deaths along with some human casualties due to the lungs filling with dust. That was because of erosion. If deforestation does not stop, then this has a chance of happening to the areas being cleared of trees and other plant life.

Over half of the world’s continents use almost eighty percent of the worlds use of coal for their production purposes. Asia uses the most coal out of the world. Aisa uses over sixty seven percent of the world's consumption of coal. Without coal to heat many factories that produce steel, those companies would perish. If those companies went away, then there would be very little to no more cars and no more of those huge and sometimes beautiful skyscrapers. Another big way the world uses coal, especially in Asian countries is by burning the coal to produce electricity. If they ever ran out of coal, that could mean disaster for those countries.   

Who likes to walk or actually exercise? Not many people I know. The solution? Cars. The problem? Oil. The world’s population of people and cars grow every year, except the oil reserves are not growing; in fact they are being largely depleted. There is on average a four and a half percent depletion of oil a year, and a need of one percent more a year. I am no mathematician but by the looks of it we are using up more and more each year. The thing is that, oil does not grow on trees, which are being hugely depleted also. Oil needs thousands of years to create reserves naturally. The process of making the crude oil that we have today, was formed by dead plants and animals that were alive one hundred and fifty million years ago. By the looks of it we do not have that kind of time before the planets oil is all but gone. With the oil spills within the last decade or so has not helped the cause of conserving the oil at all. In fact, these oil spills have polluted another major natural resource we call water.

Many people think that water is an inexhaustible natural resource, but that is not the case. Anyone around the world will look at a map and say, “What do you mean were running out of water? Do you even see the oceans?” Yes, the Earth does have a lot of water, the only thing is that less than three percent is actually drinkable fresh water. All the other ninety six or so percent is salt water or otherwise polluted. Even some of the world's fresh water is frozen in glaciers where we can't get to it. With the way the people of Earth are using up the fresh water supply and polluting it with their dangerous chemicals, it is not good for the water or the Earth itself. One way humans pollute water sources is by dumping toxic wastes from large manufacturing companies in to the water. Another way is all the oil spills that has happened over the years, some examples of these tragedies are: The gulf oil spill in 2010, the Arabian Gulf/Kuwait oil spill, and the Ixtoc oil spill. The top three oil spills in history had a total of eight hundred and sixty million gallons of crude oil that damaged our oceans and therefore our freshwater sources. This excessive amount only accounts for a few incidences.

So if we, humans of the world, use up all of our natural resources then we will all surely perish. What I want to see happen in the next - century, is the people of the world, mainly huge companies, to stop using up all the natural resources at the rate the world is depleting them. For if we do keep using up the resources how we are, then we will have to find new resources to use instead of the current oil and coal. Hopefully it doesn’t come to it, but in the most extreme circumstance, we as a planet shouldn’t have to move to another planet.

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