#Cyberpeacefare #Peace #Morals #EverybodyAnybody/Somebody/Nobody ? #Cybersilence

"The great task of peace is to work morals into it. The only sort of peace that will be real is one in which everybody takes his share of responsibility. World organizations and conferences will be of no value unless there is improvement in the relation of men to men."

Sir Frederick Eggleston

(Peace is UpU&Me/UsAll.  So Few "take share of responsibility". "We are the world - Let's make it better"  cybersilence ?).

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Tags: #cyberpeacefare, #everybody, #moral, responsibility

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Comment by Al LeBlanc on July 3, 2014 at 9:32am

I Fully Agree with Sir Frederick Eggleston, " ....IN WHICH EVERYBODY TAKES HIS SHARE OF RESPONSIBILITY"  Pope Francis is trying, Carnegie is trying, Global Zero is trying,....et al .

We All Need to be Outraged with the Insane Terrorism going on in the world - DARE TO CARE !

#Cyberpeacefare Gadfly

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Comment by Valentine Olushola Oyedipe on June 5, 2014 at 1:32pm

That is  very right Mr Al,I  quite agree with you.

Comment by Al LeBlanc on June 3, 2014 at 1:13pm
Interesting Observation !  Received an e-mail from Carnegie on massive sample experiment (n=689,003) on Facebook that "emotional contagion can be transferred without peoples' awareness and direct interaction". Suggest your point "cybersilence therefore, should not be taken as synonymous with indolence of the mind."  How do you motivate a moment of social media "courage as small a a mustard seed" to initiate Universal Peace Uprising/tsunami ?  Meditation/conscience transference/telepathy ?
Comment by Valentine Olushola Oyedipe on June 3, 2014 at 12:26pm

Improving men to men relations through cyber peacefare may not be an understatement if  we pigeonholed the phenomenon in micro digital social process sustained by technology.Cybersilence therefore, should not be taken as synonymous with indolence of the mind.However, what is critical is just a little courage as small as a mustard seed by humanity;a moral imperative for task accomplishment and discharge of moral obligations 

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