"It is more difficult to organize peace than to win  a war; but the fruits of victory will be lost if the peace is not well organized." Aristotle

Especially, Need to "Win the hearts and minds of the people." Cyberpeacefare of the people; a popular world-wide-bottom-up Individual citizen awakening of the power of their thoughts and digital devices. Once citizens of the world realize their personal cyber power, is it not a "sin" not to contribute to a world peace tsunami ?   That is the question of conscience and global ethics.

WHAT IF - WHY NOT ??    

WOULD APPRECIATE COMMENTS

CyberPeaceGadfly

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Tags: #Aristotle, #Cyberpeacefare, #Peace

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