#Cyberpeacefare #Chaos Theory (Butterfly Effect )

chaos theory: Theory that attempts to describe and explain the highly complex behavior of apparently chaotic, or unpredictable systems that show no underlying order.  The behavior of physical systems is impossible to describe, using the standard laws of physics.  This is because the mathematics needed to describe these systems is too difficult for even the largest computers.  Such systems are sometimes known as "nonlinear " or "chaotic" systems, and they include complex machines, electric  circuits, and natural phenomena such as weather. Non chaotic systems can become chaotic, as when smoothly flowing water hits a rock and becomes turbulent. The lack of an adequate description means that a standard prediction of their behavior is also impossible.  Chaos theory provides mathematical methods needed to describe chaotic systems, and even allows some general prediction of a system's likely behavior.  Chaos theory also shows, however, that even the tiniest variation in the starting conditions of a system can lead to enormous differences in the state of the system some time later. Thus because it is impossible to know the precise starting conditions of a system, accurate prediction is also impossible.   International Encyclopedia of Science and Technology, Oxford University Press, New York, 1998  

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Tags: #Chaos, #Cyberpeacefare, (Butterfly, Effect), Theory

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