Objective of Cyber Butterfly Peace (CBP) Challenge is to arouse peoples' consciences to use their Personal Cyber/Social Media Power for Initiating a CyberWorldPeaceTsunami through the "butterfly effect."

The Challenge is taken by re-broadcasting the following lyrics of popular peace song:

            "Let there be peace on earth and let it begin with me, "

One becomes a CyberPeaceCitizen by taking the CBP Challenge through RTing this tweet/message- simple enough.

 (No "ice bucket" required.  Up to U&Me/UsAll to contribute our drop(s) of water to  initiate a cyber-world peace tsunami - these drops of can swell into a tsunami.

Wikipedia/ChaosTheory/Butterfly Effect: "The sensitive dependence on initial conditions in which a small change in one state of a deterministic non-linear system can result in large differences in a later state ....,"e.g.,., Butterfly fluttering its wings causing tsunami).

CyberPeaceGadfly

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Tags: #Butterfly, #CBP, #Cyberpeacefare, Challenge, Effect

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