Checkmate- a fresh suspense thriller by Hrishikesh Joshi

It is a drama in the air and a cat and mouse game involving India’s security and the fundamentalists.
It is a high voltage game where suspense and thrill will make you compel to fasten your seatbelt from the take off ……….
It is a brilliant move of chess by some invisible mastermind…………..
It is a Checkmate- a fresh suspense thriller by Hrishikesh Joshi.
Two contemporary matters of international interest has visibly inspired the writer in writing the book-the first, is the hijack of Air India flight IC 814 by Harkat-ul-Mujahideen, a Pakistan-based Islamic extremist group and storming of the Jinnah International Airport by five assailants. A thriller was craved out by the writer from these international matters, which has every potential to be converted into an excellent Bollywood suspense movie. It is the sheer speed of the story- no, not as fast as a supersonic, but as fast as a racing car -that will give this newly released story an edge…..
In spite of being influenced by two matters of international relations-the world of the creation belongs to the creator only. The story line is original and the imagination has reached its zenith to produce a suspense story which is appealing and can impart visual effect to the reader.
Let us come to the story line. Justice Shastry-the chief justice of Mumbai High court was used as a pawn by some unknown men to hijack a London bound plane. Despite slight weakness for women, Justice Shastry is honest and truly a pride of his profession. But the unknown people had used a bait that is worthy of compelling him doing anything in the world-they had captured her dear wife. When he first got the kidnapper’s call, he felt
“His brains seemed to have jammed. He desperately hoped that he was in some kind of a nightmare. But he recovered fast. He gave the head a good shake and stood up quickly. He crossed silently as pain shot through his remaining right leg where the artificial one was attached; he paced the room twice, summoned his butler and asked him to hail a rickshaw.”

Read the complete review at
https://jayasreesown.wordpress.com/2015/04/03/the-invisible-hero/

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Tags: Taliban, fiction, fundamentalism, review, suspense, thriller

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