Carnegie Council Announces Robert J. Myers Fellows for 2019

Carnegie Council is pleased to announce the 2019 recipients of the Robert J. Myers Fellows Fund grants.

The Robert J. Myers Fellows Fund supports and promotes activities of the Carnegie Council network that embody Mr. Myers' vision of effective ethical inquiry rooted in local experiences and communities. This year 13 projects were chosen, with a diverse range of issues concerning China, the Czech Republic, Africa, Germany, Indonesia, Japan, Montenegro, Poland, and Venezuela. Topics also include climate justice, human rights, women, and more.

Robert Myers (1924-2011) was a senior-level intelligence officer turned journalist, academic, publisher, and author. As president of Carnegie Council from 1980-1994, he spearheaded an international effort to promote ethics education. The Fund was established in 2014 (the Council's Centennial year) to honor his legacy.

"Robert Myers believed that ethical inquiry could be enhanced by sharing ideas and experiences across time, space, and culture," says Joel Rosenthal, president of Carnegie Council. "These projects carry on the spirit of his work."

Recipients are selected from the Carnegie Council network only; the Fund does not accept unsolicited applications for this award.

2019 Robert J. Myers Fund Recipients and their Projects

Atik Ambarwati, Yayasan Kartini Indonesia
Supporting Pluralism: Strengthening Interfaith dialogue among Youth and Women to Promote Social Inclusivity and Religious Tolerance in Jepara District, Central Java, Indonesia

Sabrina Axster, Johns Hopkins University
Research on the Privatization of Immigration Detention in Germany

Lyn Boyd-Judson, Oxford Initiative for Global Ethics and Human Rights
The Global Women's Narratives Project

Philip Caruso, Harvard Law School
Ethical Considerations and Strategic Necessities for Montenegro

Joshua Eisenman, University of Texas, Austin
Ethical Questions around China's Political and Military Objectives in Africa

James Farrer, Sophia University
Ethical Culinary Work: Creating Intergenerational Dialogue

Yukari Kayama, Mitsubishi Corporation
Public Conferences for the Y20 Summit, Japan 2019

Layla Kilolu, East-West Center
Climate Justice: How Are Cities Preparing their most Vulnerable?

Michael Laha, Asia Society
A Tale of Two Scandals: Understanding Polish and Czech Views on U.S. Policy toward China

Kwame Marfo, Africa Empowerment Fund
More than a Game: How Soccer Explains Africa's Development

Rory Mondshein, International Association for Political Science Students
How Economics can be used for Human Rights Advocacy

Jaehyeon Park, University of California, Los Angeles
Between Formal and Customary Land Rights for Tenure Security: Land Titling of Urban Kampungs in Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Felix Quintero, Inter-American Development Bank
Venezuela at a Crossroads: Amnesty, Impunity, Justice or Vengeance?

ABOUT CARNEGIE COUNCIL
Founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1914, Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is an educational, nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that produces  lectures, publications, and multimedia materials on the ethical challenges of living in a globalized world.

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