Call for Applications for Fellowship Program "The Living Legacy of the First World War"

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is now accepting applications for the World War I fellowship project, "The Living Legacy of the First World War." Carnegie Council is creating up to 10 fellowships to conduct projects involving original research, approaches, or methods on the American experience in the First World War and its impact and relevance in the modern world. 

With this project, Carnegie Council aims to advance a vision of history that is diverse, dynamic, and inclusive. This approach begins with the selection of fellows of varying ages, backgrounds, and interests. In designing a research proposal, applicants are encouraged to draw on personal passions, integrating unique perspectives and insights into historical debates.

Selected fellows will research independently over the next year. Fellows will then share their findings and analysis in an article written for publication on carnegiecouncil.org, in Ethics & International Affairs, or through another academic or popular publisher. In the case of graphic or other non-traditional projects, a written report may be substituted for an article. To reach a broader audience, the fellows will participate in a podcast interview series on carnegiecouncil.org, where they will discuss their work. Fellows may also be invited to speak at other events associated with the centenary of World War I.

To apply, please submit a research proposal (1,000 words or fewer), curriculum vitae, and two references to program assistant Billy Pickett at bpickett@cceia.org by Friday, September 15, 2017. Proposals should include the following: the proposed research topic with background; the feasibility of the research; and the topic's bearing on the present, whether in ethical debates, political discourse, governing institutions, demography, law, international relations, or other areas. Individuals of all nationalities are encouraged to apply, though articles and interviews will be published primarily in English.

Thanks to the generous support of the Richard Lounsbery Foundation, fellows will receive a stipend to support their research.

For questions, please contact the lead administrator for the World War I fellowship project and Carnegie Council senior fellow, Reed Bonadonna at rbonadonna@cceia.org.

Photo: North Carolina Veterans Memorial--Scene 1 from WWI. CREDIT: Universal Pops (CC)

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