Call for Abstracts for Carnegie Council's May 3 Student Research Conference, Deadline March 8, 2019

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is pleased to announce its fifth annual student research conference. It will be held in Carnegie Council's New York City headquarters on Friday, May 3, 2019 from 12:00 to 3:00 pm.

Lunch will be served during a networking session, followed by presentations of original research by students from universities across the New York City metro area. Audience members will include students, professors, professionals, and the interested public.

Presentations will be 10 minutes long and should make an argument about international affairs and its ethical implications and can be based on research students are currently conducting. Topics can include human rights, media, international law, justice, accountability, democracy, sustainability, transparency.

There are a limited number of presentation slots available. We ask that all interested candidates submit an abstract of no more than 500 words. The deadline for the abstract submission is Friday, March 8, 2019.

The best presentation will receive a free year-long membership to the Council's Carnegie New Leaders program, judged by a panel of academic and business professionals.

If you are interested in submitting, please email your 500 words to Amanda Ghanooni at aghanooni@cceia.org. Please include your full name, email, university, and major/graduate program. Recent graduates are also welcome to submit!

Image: Carnegie Council Student Research Conference, 2018. CREDIT: Amanda Ghanooni

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