Buds of Hope : Organic Jasmine floriculture supplements farmer income in Maharashtra (India)

My new article covers the jasmine (also known as mogra in Hindi and Marathi) floriculture initiative undertaken by the tribal (Katkari) farmers in the Vikramgad block of Thane district. Technical assistance from a local NGO has helped these poor farmers to supplement their seasonal income by cultivating organic jasmine buds for the markets of Mumbai. Suitable market linkages (overseas and domestic markets) and public policy measures can help to propel such initiatives to greater heights and lead to a win-win situation for the buyers and sellers besides conserving the local traditions, culture, and the flora and fauna of the region. Please click "Buds of Hope" for details.

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Tags: agriculture, development, poverty

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