One of our GEN members, Maria Isabel Mendiola, is in the Philippines coping with the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, which impacted her family home. We posted a photo album of the photos she sent, and here is how she described the situation in an email:

As of the moment I am now in Cebu to buy basic things and food that are needed by my family, I'm also here because I need to communicate well to my relatives because they are also worried to us, we don't have electricity in our place. When it comes to food here, we're given like 5minutes to shop for 1 basket only so that no one could just monopolize what the grocery store is selling and there's only so few of them operating because most of the establishments in our place was really damaged by the typhoon. some people distributed relief goods in our place but its not adequate enough for all so I'm still thankful that despite our situation, my parents still thinks of giving way and prioritizing the relief goods to much unfortunate and poorer people. repairing our house could not be easily done as of this moment due to inadequate resources of the materials, and also prices went high and so honestly, I really need help. what we basically need right now is food, a clean water, also some clothes and a milk for my youngest sister... It's really costly for us that I still have to cross another place like here now in Cebu so that I would be able to buy all the things we needed. from clothes til food. I don't know in which way you could probably help us but whatever your choice of helping us will be very much appreciated. I witnessed US Navy checking our place, i took some pictures of them.. We're thankful and hopeful that at least a lot of countries helped us already because we can't just really do it just on our own. the damage was really really big and a lot of people got traumatized. Even a million peso worth of house was being destroyed by the typhoon that's why, there's no rich and no poor in our place right now because all of us were victims and suffered the outcomes of the typhoon. But despite of everything, I learned a lot from it.. I hope one day I could write it all down so that people could reflect from it. thanks for your concern.

We just wanted to share this story with you since in times of crisis the world must work together. Here is a list of suggestions of where to donate to support the relief efforts.

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