Name: Micah School: Homeschooled Grade: 11th                                                                 Problems with religion   Since the beginning of time, people have had religion to give the…

Name: Micah

School: Homeschooled

Grade: 11th

                                                                Problems with religion

 

Since the beginning of time, people have had religion to give them a more fulfilling and purposeful life. They feel more comfortable having something not of this world that they can get help from when all else fails. In fact, many people keep religion simply because they are afraid of being alone in the world and feel more comfortable with help from a God or gods. Unfortunately, the belief and ideas of religion and God have been altered in several ways over thousands of years by different cultures. All of the changes eventually started to hurt communities because some people worded things in a way so that they would receive power and ultimately place themselves above the rest. Most of these people held a rocky disposition and led unstable lives which is why they hoped to gain more from the world by taking control.

Much of the chaos is due the fact that all religions believe their way is the only way and and are opposed to the possibility that it could be wrong. It is interesting that some can scoff at another’s religion’s basis and yet have one that is possibly more eccentric. When Christians hear the story of Mohamed riding his flying horse, they think that its crazy and yet their own story of a talking snake in a garden is easily more believable. The issue is that when there are several religions all with difficult to believe stories, it is very tough to decipher which one is right.

Another problem is that many people decide to take part in a particular faith simply because they want it to be true; especially when they like the reward involved in the end. For Christians, this means heaven. For Muslims, this means popularity and what would have made them happy on Earth. These rewards are much of the reason why some people follow the corresponding beliefs since without them, these religions would be far less appealing.

Today there is a lot of scientific ideas on the world that easily seem to overwhelm the ancient myths which used to be the only way of understanding any sort of religion.

So to fix many of these issues, it would certainly help to spend time searching each religion for what makes the most sense. By having the freedom to make your own choice, you have the power to make your life one of reason that’s controlled by you.

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