Winners of Carnegie Council's 2017 International Student Photo Contest on Climate Change

Carnegie Council is delighted to announce the winners of its fifth annual International Student Photography Contest. The topic was Climate Change. We asked for photos that show examples of climate change OR examples of combating or adapting to climate change.

We were pleased to see a wide range of interesting photos from around the world. The judges awarded one first prize, one second prize, and also an honorable mention, all featured below.

FIRST PRIZE

"Chain"
Bohua Duan
Beijing No.4 High School International Campus, China

"Smog has remained as a major threat to the residents in Beijing for almost five years. In 2013, smog became the center of public debate. However, the issue continued to exist. The picture was taken in December 29, 2017 in my school. The air is still pungent and noxious; the sky is still monotonous and depressive. Smog is like an intangible chain twined over Beijing. It is hard to unlock but not impossible, nevertheless. The key to open it must be somewhere yet nobody knows. It seemed formidable and perpetual so we must strive hard to combat smog."---Bohua Duan

SECOND PRIZE

"High Water"
Jiangfeng Chu
North Allegheny Intermediate High School, Pennsylvania, USA

"This photograph of Lake Mead was taken from the top of the Hoover Dam from the Nevada side. Lake Mead is fed by the Colorado River, whose discharge mostly originates from snowmelt in the Rocky Mountains. The lake's water level has been steadily dropping during the 21st century due to major shrinkages of the Rocky Mountain snowpack. As the water surface falls, a distinct "bathtub ring" can be seen surrounding the shoreline. The white color is caused by the precipitation of calcium-rich minerals onto the previously submerged rock. The ring serves as a stark reminder of the danger that climate change presents to agriculture and drinking water supplies in the surrounding regions. Even more alarming is the realization that similar changes are occurring around the planet. If we do not take immediate action against climate change, the ring around Lake Mead may soon become a porcelain bowl extending to the lake floor."---Jiangfeng Chu

HONORABLE MENTION

"Vertical Garden"
Yat Chun Wong
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China

"A vertical garden in Bukit Tinggi, Malaysia contributes to the superb air quality in the region."---Yat Chun Wong

The contest was conducted via Carnegie Council's online Global Ethics Network, a global community platform for exploring the role of ethics in international affairs. Everyone is free to join and we welcome new members.

Many thanks to all who took part! See all the entries here.

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Tags: #essay2017, contest, photo

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Comment by Mohammed Salman Ali on January 28, 2018 at 12:01am
Great!! All entries are superb. Congratulations to all
Comment by Emmanuella Chisom James on January 27, 2018 at 6:51pm

wow! Such wonderful photos. Congrats to the winners

Comment by Kenneth Okpomo on January 24, 2018 at 8:24am

I congratulate the winners and all those who participated in the photo contest as we try to keep anthropogenic climate change under check. God bless you all.

Comment by Valentine Olushola Oyedipe on January 22, 2018 at 1:45pm

Congratulations winners and all participants.

Comment by Mohammed Salman Ali on January 19, 2018 at 9:16pm
Good pics guys, keep going!
Comment by Al LeBlanc on January 19, 2018 at 5:05pm

CONGRATULATIONS ALL !

Comment by shweta vikas khoday on January 19, 2018 at 2:09pm

Thanks 

Comment by Hanane Saouli on January 19, 2018 at 7:30am

good very nice good luck

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