All Blog Posts Tagged 'religion' (31)

From Where I See by Dr. Ajay Yadav- a review attempt

From Where I See From Where I See by Ajay Yadav

My rating: 5 of 5 stars



The child asked with utter ignorance or innocence-sometimes ignorance and innocence are… Continue

Added by JAYASREE ROY on April 14, 2015 at 4:14am — No Comments

LETTER FROM A DEAD ……….

From the prison cell of smallest possible dimension I can see the sentries are exchanging guards-are on a strict vigil, as if a criminal like me can escape from the cell in a whisker- by dint of a magic lamp.

Even if I have the magic lamp, I will never ever think of escaping. I am not a coward!

Or am I!

When the special court judge had pronounced the death penalty- I was boiling hot with anger. Since I was inducted in the mission-our philosophers told us that we are going to…

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Added by JAYASREE ROY on April 2, 2015 at 7:40am — No Comments

Religion in Peace and Reconciliation: Case of Central African Republic

Often times, religion is shunned as the cause of conflict in many parts of the world. In the case of Central African Republic, there are three leaders who have used religion as a positive force in the midst of the ongoing violence. 

Pastor Nicolas Guerekoyame-Gbangou, president of the Evangelical Alliance in the CAR, Imam Oumar Kobine Layama, president of the Central African Islamic Community, and Archbishop Dieudonné Nzapalainga have begun working together calling for peace and unity…

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Added by Marielle Ali on August 2, 2014 at 5:00pm — 5 Comments

NEW BOOK: The Awakening of Muslim Democracy

We are pleased to announce that Global Ethics Fellow Jocelyne Cesari has a new book out from Cambridge University Press: The Awakening of Muslim Democracy: Religion,…

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Added by Carnegie Council on April 23, 2014 at 4:33pm — No Comments

From War to a Global Ethic

This Carnegie Council Centennial Symposium took place in the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh, on October 16, 2013. It was part of Andrew Carnegie's International Legacy Week 2013, which celebrated the huge impact made by the Scots-American philanthropist Andrew…

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Added by Joel Rosenthal on November 22, 2013 at 1:30pm — No Comments

What to remember in Syria from the Iraq sectarian war

Last week, in a effort to reassure a skeptical American public,  President Obama declared that a U.S. intervention in Syria, currently in debate in the Congress, would not be the same as the ones in…

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Added by Jocelyne Cesari on September 11, 2013 at 1:30pm — 2 Comments

Thought Leader: Rowan Williams

DEVIN STEWART: What is unique today, particularly from a moral perspective?

ROWAN WILLIAMS: I think the big factor for the world today is, of course, global communication, the rapidity and the reach of global communication and the fact that anybody, in effect, can post views electronically and have a…

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Added by Carnegie Council on August 1, 2013 at 11:53am — 1 Comment

Humanity's Four Challenges

By Grand Mufti Mustafa Ceric of Bosnia-Herzegovina

I believe there are four challenges for us that are over our heads. These challenges I would describe as four roads: from might to right, from slavery to freedom, from mythology to science, and from theory of state to democracy of state. Let me explain.

This civilization that we live in—you may call it Western…

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Added by Carnegie Council on July 23, 2013 at 4:30pm — 2 Comments

Thought Leader: Jay Winter

As part of the Carnegie Council Centennial Thought Leaders Forum, Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart spoke with Jay Winter, currently the Charles J. Stille Professor of History at Yale University, where he focuses on World War I and its impact on the 20th century.

DEVIN STEWART: Given your work as a historian, when you…

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Added by Carnegie Council on June 24, 2013 at 10:40am — No Comments

Thought Leader: Rachel Kleinfeld

As part of the Carnegie Council Centennial Thought Leaders Forum, Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart spoke with Rachel Kleinfeld, founding president of the Truman National Security Project.

DEVIN STEWART: Rachel, great to have you here. The first question that we ask our interviewees is, how do you see the world today? How do you define our time, particularly…

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Added by Carnegie Council on June 10, 2013 at 12:00pm — 1 Comment

Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev: The Terrorists Next Door?

The bombings at the Boston Marathon brings homegrown terrorism back into the spotlight. Suspects…

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Added by Jocelyne Cesari on April 29, 2013 at 4:30pm — No Comments

Thought Leader: Jonathan Sacks

As part of the Carnegie Council Centennial Thought Leaders Forum, Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart spoke with Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, chief rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of the Commonwealth and spiritual head of the United Synagogue, the largest synagogue body in the UK.

DEVIN STEWART: Thank you for taking…

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Added by Carnegie Council on April 22, 2013 at 11:26am — No Comments

Thought Leader: Hans Küng

As part of the Carnegie Council Centennial Thought Leaders Forum, Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart corresponded via email with Dr. Hans Küng. Dr. Küng is a Catholic priest and president of the Foundation for a Global Ethic.

DEVIN STEWART: What is morally distinct about the age we live in?

HANS…

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Added by Carnegie Council on April 12, 2013 at 11:04am — No Comments

Thought Leader: Mary Robinson

As part of the Carnegie Council Centennial Thought Leaders Forum, Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart spoke with Mary Robinson, former president of Ireland, and a former UN high commissioner for Human Rights. She is currently chancellor of the University of Dublin (Trinity College) and president of the Mary Robinson Foundation -…

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Added by Carnegie Council on March 28, 2013 at 11:30am — No Comments

Iraq: Is Religious Sectarianism a Fatal Flaw?

The consequence on American economy has been far reaching. In 2011, the Watson Institute at Brown University estimated the cost of U.S. wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan to $3.2 to $4 trillion. Sure, removing Hussein created the conditions for democracy but Iraq is divided by sectarian politics, crippled by violence,…

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Added by Jocelyne Cesari on March 20, 2013 at 11:00am — No Comments

Religion and atheism: tolerance and pluralism

A remarkable example of pluralism: Joseph Weiler, a well-renowned and respected academic of Jewish origin, defended (pro bono) the right of Italy to display the crucifix in public schools in the case Lautsi v. Italy (June 2010). Worth listening.

http://https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioyIyxM-gnM

Added by Valéria Guimarães L. Silva on February 15, 2013 at 8:00pm — 1 Comment

Thought Leader: Thomas Pogge

DEVIN STEWART: Professor Pogge, as we were talking about earlier, you have been thinking about the arc of history and your thoughts about the world we're living in today. If you could just start off by telling us, how do you see the world we live in today, especially from a moral perspective?

THOMAS POGGE:…

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Added by Carnegie Council on February 11, 2013 at 5:23pm — 2 Comments

Muslim Democracies: A New Kind of Political System?

The 2012 victory of Islamic parties after the revolutions in Egypt and Tunisia has brought back the “endless” doubt regarding the role of Islam in possible transitions to democracy. This doubt has been shaped for decades by the circumstances of the Islamic Revolution in Iran that resulted into an authoritarian regime ruled by clerics, not to mention by the fear of elections leading to civil…

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Added by Jocelyne Cesari on January 31, 2013 at 3:00pm — No Comments

Thought Leader: Michael Walzer

DEVIN STEWART: Professor Walzer, the first question is: What's morally distinct about the age we live in today?

MICHAEL WALZER: I thought about that when I read your list of questions. You mean what is different between our world and, say, the world of the…

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Added by Carnegie Council on November 14, 2012 at 12:32pm — No Comments

Arab and American Constitutional Thrills

The latest column from Rami Khouri:

There are few things in life as exhilarating as countries developing into constitutional democracies. I have spent the past eight weeks delving into this process in both the United States and the Middle East. I have physically visited Boston, Philadelphia, New York, Boston, Providence and other seminal places in early American…

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Added by Carnegie Council on November 6, 2012 at 4:09pm — No Comments

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Gene Editing Governance & Dr. He Jiankui, with Jeffrey Kahn

Jeffrey Kahn, director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute for Bioethics, discusses the many governance issues connected to gene editing. Plus, he gives a first-hand account of an historic conference in Hong Kong last year in which Dr. He Jiankui shared his research on the birth of the world's first germline genetically engineered babies. What's the future of the governance of this emerging technology?

Trump is the Symptom, Not the Problem

Astute observers of U.S. foreign policy have been making the case, as we move into the 2020 elections, not to see the interruptions in the flow of U.S. foreign policy solely as a result of the personality and foibles of the current occupant of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, writes Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev. Ian Bremmer and Colin Dueck expand on this thought.

Gene Editing: Overview, Ethics, & the Near Future, with Robert Klitzman

In the first in a series of podcasts on gene editing, Columbia's Dr. Robert Klitzman provides an overview of the technology, ethical and governance issues, and where it could all go in the near future. Plus he explains why the birth of genetically engineered twins in China last year was a "seismic" event. How could gene editing lead to more inequality? What could be some of unintended consequences?

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