All Blog Posts Tagged 'poverty' (29)

THE SOLUTION TO OUR WIDENING POVERTY GAP

The greatest social problem that we are experiencing today is the growing difference between the poor and the rich and we have learned to accept it. But it is at terrible cost in separation and the associated feelings of anger, depression and helplessness, between the people who have jobs that provide stable incomes with comfortable homes and those who don't and can't. The practical solution here is driving me nuts!

 Many governments have made progress in easing this injustice--some…

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Added by David Harold Chester on October 30, 2017 at 7:00am — 3 Comments

Environmental Inequality: Where Does London Rubbish Go After Collection?

In the last decade, the city of London has given a lot of volume to the topic of recycling and environmental responsibility. Rubbish regulations between London councils and residents have increased, recycling rates have grown and the new COP 21 agreement has reached a very optimistic target for the UK's waste management program.

That's a pretty picture, but where does all the rubbish go for clearance and recycling? Statistics show – in low-income areas with high poverty…

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Added by Christabel Benoit on May 25, 2016 at 7:30am — 1 Comment

Presidential Election: Crying (Tears of Hope) for you, Argentina

[This article was first published in the World Section of the Huffington Post on 21 October 2015.]

By Jesica L. Santos*

22 October 2015

On 25 October, Argentinians will go the polls to elect their next democratic president who, for the first time since 2003, won't have "Kirchner" as a last name. But the choice Argentinians will really be making concerns not an individual but, rather, the type of country they want to recover.

The current populist government has…

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Added by Jesica L Santos on October 22, 2015 at 10:22am — 1 Comment

Poverty, Powder Kegs, and Stereotypes

Have you ever heard it said that “poverty is a powder keg”? That image has been used by leaders like Bill Clinton and Desmond Tutu in an attempt to spur society to overcome poverty — a worthy goal. But unfortunately that same image feeds the stereotype of the poor as violent, dangerous, and undeserving of help. In every country, this prejudice leads society to distrust the homeless, beggars, or street children.…



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Added by Diana Skelton on July 29, 2015 at 9:57am — No Comments

Advocating for Better Humanitarian Aid

The United Nations is planning a World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) — scheduled for May 2016 in Istanbul — in order to improve the effectiveness of aid to victims of both armed conflicts and…

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Added by Diana Skelton on April 9, 2015 at 11:07am — No Comments

Poverty and Shame in Pakistan

Screen shot 2014-07-29 at 10.52.40 AM

Here is another of the videos done by Oxford University faculty Elaine Chase & Robert Walker

They write: "The link between poverty and shame has…

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Added by Diana Skelton on August 6, 2014 at 6:05pm — No Comments

Shaming People Won't Get Them Off Welfare

This is a really excellent article by Oxford's Robert Walker about his research on poverty and shame:

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jun/29/shaming-people-welfare-work-policy

Added by Diana Skelton on July 2, 2014 at 12:53pm — No Comments

The Bottom Billion: An Antidote to the Violence of Competition

“Competition breeds excellence” is a mantra I heard growing up. But excellence at what exactly? Some of the most competitive business schools in the United States have trained finance wizards to gamble on the value of basic human necessities, like food and homes, winning huge profits for themselves, while bankrupting many others. In the weeks following the Haitian earthquake,…

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Added by Diana Skelton on June 26, 2014 at 12:30pm — 2 Comments

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY 2014

In honor of International Women's Day on March 8, we present a selection of Carnegie Council resources from the past year. PHOTO CREDIT: Martina K Photography (…

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Added by Carnegie Council on March 7, 2014 at 12:30pm — No Comments

Guinea: the end of the democratic transition?

With a two years delay, this Saturday more than five million Guineans were finally called to participate in a legislative election that officially certified the completion of the path to democracy –a process that begun in November 2010 with the first transparent and open presidential election in Guinea since its independence from France in 1958.

Yet, do these long overdue elections really mark the final of the transition?

 Technically, yes. Despite flaws –some voting stations…

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Added by Ana Polo Alonso on October 1, 2013 at 8:00am — 2 Comments

Thought Leader: Nancy Birdsall

As part of the Carnegie Council Centennial Thought Leaders Forum, Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart spoke with Nancy Birdsall, founding president of the Center for Global Development.

DEVIN STEWART: Dr. Birdsall, great to have you here today. Thank you for coming to Carnegie Council.

NANCY…

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Added by Carnegie Council on May 31, 2013 at 11:16am — No Comments

Thought Leader: Louise Arbour

As part of the Carnegie Council Centennial Thought Leaders Forum, Carnegie Council's David Speedie spoke with Louise Arbour, president and CEO of the International Crisis Group. Previously she was United Nations high commissioner for human rights. 

DAVID SPEEDIE: What do you believe is morally distinct about the…

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Added by Carnegie Council on May 8, 2013 at 2:22pm — No Comments

Thought Leader: Mary Robinson

As part of the Carnegie Council Centennial Thought Leaders Forum, Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart spoke with Mary Robinson, former president of Ireland, and a former UN high commissioner for Human Rights. She is currently chancellor of the University of Dublin (Trinity College) and president of the Mary Robinson Foundation -…

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Added by Carnegie Council on March 28, 2013 at 11:30am — No Comments

Thought Leader: Somaly Mam

DEVIN STEWART: The first question is, how do you see the world today? When you think about the world, how would you describe it, particularly from the big moral issues? What issues do you think are important?

SOMALY MAM: It's not easy for me because I come from Cambodia and see the world here.…

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Added by Carnegie Council on February 21, 2013 at 12:30pm — No Comments

Thought Leader: Thomas Pogge

DEVIN STEWART: Professor Pogge, as we were talking about earlier, you have been thinking about the arc of history and your thoughts about the world we're living in today. If you could just start off by telling us, how do you see the world we live in today, especially from a moral perspective?

THOMAS POGGE:…

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Added by Carnegie Council on February 11, 2013 at 5:23pm — 2 Comments

Thought Leader: Steve Coll

DEVIN STEWART: I'm here with Steve Coll, head of the New America Foundation.

Steve, thank you very much for coming.

STEVE COLL: My pleasure.

DEVIN STEWART: We're doing these irresponsibly big questions, crazy questions, as you might have seen. The first question is, what is distinct about the age we live…

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Added by Carnegie Council on December 19, 2012 at 1:33pm — 3 Comments

Thought Leader: Pankaj Ghemawat

DEVIN STEWART: How do you see the age in which we live? How is it distinct from a moral perspective?

PANKAJ GHEMAWAT: I think that the age we live in is distinct from a moral perspective from the ones that preceded it, certainly in terms of the awareness or the ability to be aware of what's happening to other people in…

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Added by Carnegie Council on December 13, 2012 at 6:06pm — No Comments

Buds of Hope : Organic Jasmine floriculture supplements farmer income in Maharashtra (India)

My new article covers the jasmine (also known as mogra in Hindi and Marathi) floriculture initiative undertaken by the tribal (Katkari) farmers in the Vikramgad block of Thane district. Technical assistance from a local NGO has helped these poor farmers to supplement their seasonal income by cultivating organic jasmine buds for the markets of Mumbai. Suitable market linkages (overseas and domestic markets) and public policy measures can help to…

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Added by Raji Ajwani-Ramchandani on December 12, 2012 at 9:30am — No Comments

Ethics, International Relations, and Global Environmental Governance

LORRAINE ELLIOTT, Professor of International Relations at the Australian National University, delivered a public lecture entitled "Ethics, International Relations, and Global Environmental Governance" in Singapore at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (RSIS), Nanyang Technological University, on Monday, November 19, 2012.…

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Added by Carnegie Council on November 20, 2012 at 2:30pm — No Comments

Academics Standing Against Poverty: New Special Issue of "Ethics & International Affairs"

I'm excited to announce that Ethics & International Affairs has just published its summer 2012 issue, which is guest edited by Thomas Pogge and Luis Cabrera, and features a truly…

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Added by Zach Dorfman on August 3, 2012 at 3:30pm — No Comments

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