All Blog Posts Tagged 'policy' (9)

International relations and their relation to other concepts

is the concept of international relations of the concepts that aroused considerable controversy, and many of the problems, both theoretical and applied research, analytical, and refer to the overlapping of the complexity of the many terms and concepts of international relations, where we find that there is no agreed definition by western scientists and researchers.

 Unesco has decided in 1948 several topics of international relations has emerged many terms near term international…

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Added by Hanane Saouli on August 19, 2017 at 6:00pm — 2 Comments

The EU and Transitional Justice: New Policy Adopted

On 16 November 2015, the Foreign Affairs Council adopted the Council Conclusions on the EU’s support to transitional justice along with the Joint Staff Working Document: "The EU’s Framework on support to transitional justice". The full document is available at: http://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-13576-2015-INIT/en/pdf ;

It…

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Added by Jesica L Santos on November 17, 2015 at 3:51pm — No Comments

The Problems with Burma's Upcoming "Landmark" Elections

 

As November 8th approaches, news and commentary about the “landmark” Burmese general elections are picking up. As usual, I have my own thoughts about the growing buzz surrounding Election Day.

Let's start off with some quick background information. The upcoming November 8th election in Burma is widely considered to be one of the most important political events in the nation’s history. The authoritarian regime, still warring with several ethnic rebel…

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Added by Samantha Sherman on September 9, 2015 at 4:00pm — 2 Comments

Political Prisoner for a Day: Why Small-Scale Crackdowns Still Work

The past week has confirmed that despite the Burmese government's made-for-export show of reforms, there is still no such thing as political freedom in Burma. Yet, you probably haven't read anything about the nation's ongoing (but increasingly repressed) student protests in this week's headlines. That's largely because the regime has responded in such a way that is threatening enough to stifle dissent at home, but not violent enough to invoke international outrage. This is the "sweet spot"…

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Added by Samantha Sherman on March 15, 2015 at 1:12am — No Comments

Why I’m Following the Burmese Student Protests, and the US Government Should Be Too

Over the past few months, the world has largely overlooked a series of peaceful protests by Burmese students that began in November, coinciding with President Obama’s visit to the Southeast Asian nation. The students are protesting the country’s new National Education Law, which maintains close, centralized government control of the nation’s educational institutions and limit students’ freedom of association (read more…

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Added by Samantha Sherman on February 13, 2015 at 12:30am — 1 Comment

Burma and the Ethics of Engagement

A question I've been grappling with lately concerns engagement with foreign governments that systematically violate human rights. When foreign governments are behaving badly, should we engage with them and try to encourage reform, or sanction them and cut off ties? Is engagement the path to reform, or does it merely reward bad behavior? While this dilemma is central to many foreign affairs situations, this post will focus on…

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Added by Samantha Sherman on December 19, 2014 at 12:30am — 6 Comments

JOB: Professor of international human rights, Duke University

The DUKE UNIVERSITY Sanford School of Public Policy, in conjunction with the Kenan Institute for Ethics, invites applications from scholars whose principal research, teaching, and policy interests focus on international human rights and related questions of global governance, political philosophy, or international law. The position is open rank, tenure-line. We invite applications…

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Added by Carnegie Council on November 26, 2012 at 4:06pm — No Comments

Ethical Activism Amid Politics as Usual

The latest from Global Ethics Fellow Rami Khouri:

BOSTON -- Two very different ways for the United States to deal with Arabs and Israelis were on show last week in the United States. The contrast was stunning between the televised debate between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney in which “I Love Israel more than You Love Israel” was the background theme song that…

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Added by Carnegie Council on October 26, 2012 at 12:23pm — 1 Comment

Do Language Policies Contribute to Poverty and Underdevelopment?

Language is one of the most neglected areas in the development field. It barely registers on any agenda to help poor countries despite its importance to a number of crucial areas and it being a barrier to progress in many fragile states. Why is this?

Language is how individuals communicate, acquire knowledge, and work with others. It is how…

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Added by Seth Kaplan on July 25, 2012 at 9:30am — No Comments

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Carnegie Council

Vox Populi: What Americans Think About Foreign Policy, with Dina Smeltz & Mark Hannah

What do Americans think about the role the United States should be playing in the world? How do they conceive of the different trade-offs between domestic and international affairs, among competing options and sets of interests and values? The Chicago Council on Global Affairs' Dina Smeltz and Eurasia Group Foundation's Mark Hannah share the results of surveys from their organizations in this conversation with Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev.

China's Changing Role in the Pandemic-Driven World, with Amitai Etzioni & Nikolas Gvosdev

How has the pandemic changed U.S-China relations? How has it altered China's relationship with other nations and its geopolitical positioning? George Washington University's Amitai Etzioni and Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev discuss these questions and more as they break down "great power competition" in the era of COVID-19.

TIGRE: The Missing Link? Operationalizing the Democratic Community Narrative

Does the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as renewed concerns about overdependence on China, create an opening for the United States to move forward on decoupling from autocracies and reorienting both security and economic ties to allies who share similar values? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev shares his thoughts.

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