Kirthi Jayakumar's Blog Posts Tagged 'law' (2)

To what extent?

The reason that most scholars attribute to the “failure” of International Law, is that it is purely consent based. Treaties that bind a state through its consent, ratification and accession alone can be invoked against it. Customary norms that a state does not persistently or subsequently object to are the only things that bind it. Judicial decisions do not hold sway with the principle of stare decisis, as they bind only those states that are party to it. Any source of law, therefore, is…

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Added by Kirthi Jayakumar on March 24, 2013 at 2:10am — No Comments

Chad's Prosecution Chambers

Twenty years after the brutal reign ended, Chad’s ex-dictator, Hissene Habre, is now being prosecuted by the Extraordinary African Chambers in Senegal. Habre’s exit to Senegal in 1990 came just after his brutal reign drew to an end – a period that was characterised heavily by torture and killings that numbered by the thousands. A domestic Chadian inquiry was instituted, and while in exile, Habre remained at large.

He managed to escape many attempts that were made to initiate trials…

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Added by Kirthi Jayakumar on February 17, 2013 at 1:00am — No Comments

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Global Ethics Weekly: The U.S.-Taliban Negotiations, with Jonathan Cristol

Jonathan Cristol, author of "The United States and Taliban before and after 9/11," discusses the status of the latest talks between the U.S. government and the Taliban, in an effort to end the decades-long war in Afghanistan. Are women's rights being addressed? Are neighboring countries' interests being taken into account? And can we trust the Trump administration in this tense geopolitical environment?

Jerome A. Cohen on the Taiwan Relations Act

U.S.-Taiwan relations have long been an ingenious balancing act of "strategic ambiguity." What does the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act entail and why is it important, not only to Taiwan, but to U.S.-China relations and indeed security across Asia? Legendary China expert Jerome Cohen unpacks the history of Taiwan since 1895, its current situation and legal status, and what this could mean for Asia and the United States.

Jingjing Zhang: Greening China's Globalization

Born in China, environmental lawyer Jingjing Zhang is working to hold China accountable for the negative impacts of its overseas investment and construction projects, the value of which is close to $2 trillion. Known as the "Erin Brockovitch of China," she investigates cases from Africa to Latin America to Southeast Asia, to ensure Chinese companies' compliance with environmental laws and international human rights standards.

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