All Blog Posts Tagged 'law' (23)

The dialectic of the relationship between international humanitarian law and human rights law

    International humanitarian law in times of war and conflict, if in turn to a set of international rules from the settlement of humanitarian problems arising from armed conflicts, on the one hand, it aims to achieve the pain of war, by organizing intellectual operations or means of war. It is this post's comments, aimed at the protection of persons injured, prisoners, and civilians, as well as the properties that are affected by the armed conflict, either…

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Added by Hanane Saouli on August 5, 2017 at 2:30pm — 2 Comments

A Step Back for South Africa on the Rule of Law, Courtesy of Al-Bashir

Published originally in the World Post Section of the Huffington Post on 19 June 2015:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jesica-l-santos/a-step-back-for-south-afr_b_7614908.html

This past week the South African government showed utter disregard for its international legal obligations and rule of law when it reportedly assisted the escape from its territory of Sudanese President Omar…

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Added by Jesica L Santos on June 25, 2015 at 2:04pm — 1 Comment

A Letter to Andrew Carnegie on the Eve of the Carnegie Council Centennial

Dear Mr. Carnegie,

As the current president of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs, it is my privilege to report to you on the eve of the 100th anniversary of our founding.

It is not often that we have an opportunity to think in terms of 100 years. It's a span well-suited to remind us that while our lives…

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Added by Joel Rosenthal on October 30, 2013 at 12:41pm — 1 Comment

NEW BOOK: The Ethics of Preventive War

In The Ethics of Preventive War, a new book edited by Carnegie Council Global Ethics Fellow Deen Chatterjee, 11 leading theorists debate the normative challenges of preventive war through the lens of important public and political…

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Added by Carnegie Council on September 19, 2013 at 5:22pm — 2 Comments

Non-use of nuclear weapons: Why nuclear weapons are outlawed, and why the window left open in 1996 was a failure

In recent years the debate on outlawing nuclear weapons has (re)emerged. By naming personal experienced events, I have tried to summarize this issue - which, in my point of view, has a strong normative ethical componant. 

Background

In the bold discussions on the NPT and its review process, some states argue with legal and normative obligations not to use nuclear weapons. The non-Alignement Movement (NAM) and the New Agenda Coalition (NAC) stated that the use of nuclear weapons…

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Added by Armin Hübner on August 22, 2013 at 8:09am — 1 Comment

The Ethics of Globalization and the Globalization of Ethics

Carnegie Council Centennial Chair Michael Ignatieff gave this public speech at Universidade Estácio, Rio de Janeiro,as part of the Council's first Global Ethical Dialogues.

It's a great pleasure to be here. I want to thank…

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Added by Carnegie Council on June 27, 2013 at 5:21pm — 1 Comment

Insights into Arab Youth Today

The latest from Rami G. Khouri—When I visited Cairo this week for the first time in nearly a year, the changed mood among young and old alike hit me in the face like the hot and dusty wind coming off the Egyptian desert. The desire to achieve the full gains of the revolution was still there, but so were concerns that new burdens and constraints were starting to…

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Added by Carnegie Council on June 11, 2013 at 2:00pm — No Comments

To what extent?

The reason that most scholars attribute to the “failure” of International Law, is that it is purely consent based. Treaties that bind a state through its consent, ratification and accession alone can be invoked against it. Customary norms that a state does not persistently or subsequently object to are the only things that bind it. Judicial decisions do not hold sway with the principle of stare decisis, as they bind only those states that are party to it. Any source of law, therefore, is…

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Added by Kirthi Jayakumar on March 24, 2013 at 2:10am — No Comments

Chad's Prosecution Chambers

Twenty years after the brutal reign ended, Chad’s ex-dictator, Hissene Habre, is now being prosecuted by the Extraordinary African Chambers in Senegal. Habre’s exit to Senegal in 1990 came just after his brutal reign drew to an end – a period that was characterised heavily by torture and killings that numbered by the thousands. A domestic Chadian inquiry was instituted, and while in exile, Habre remained at large.

He managed to escape many attempts that were made to initiate trials…

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Added by Kirthi Jayakumar on February 17, 2013 at 1:00am — No Comments

The Impressive and Ugly Debate on Drones

By Rami G. Khouri: WASHINGTON, D.C. -- If you want to better understand the best and worst aspects of the American system of government and the morality that underpins it, you should follow one of the most fascinating developments taking place in the U.S. capital these days: the debate that has opened on the secretive world of the government’s use of unmanned drones to kill…

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Added by Carnegie Council on February 12, 2013 at 12:38pm — 1 Comment

A Global Movement for Climate Justice

The center does not hold. The weather becomes increasingly erratic and dangerous. It's long past time for effective action to avoid global climate catastrophe. And yet periodic global climate conferences end with declarations, described by José Manuel Durão…

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Added by Roy Morrison on February 12, 2013 at 10:00am — 1 Comment

Michael Ignatieff: Reimagining a Global Ethic

This is the lead article in the symposium "In Search of a Global Ethic" in Ethics & International Affairs 26.1 (Spring 2012). For the full symposium, click…

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Added by Carnegie Council on January 22, 2013 at 1:30pm — No Comments

JOB: Professor of international human rights, Duke University

The DUKE UNIVERSITY Sanford School of Public Policy, in conjunction with the Kenan Institute for Ethics, invites applications from scholars whose principal research, teaching, and policy interests focus on international human rights and related questions of global governance, political philosophy, or international law. The position is open rank, tenure-line. We invite applications…

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Added by Carnegie Council on November 26, 2012 at 4:06pm — No Comments

Ethical Activism Amid Politics as Usual

The latest from Global Ethics Fellow Rami Khouri:

BOSTON -- Two very different ways for the United States to deal with Arabs and Israelis were on show last week in the United States. The contrast was stunning between the televised debate between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney in which “I Love Israel more than You Love Israel” was the background theme song that…

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Added by Carnegie Council on October 26, 2012 at 12:23pm — 1 Comment

Peace: What Is It Good For?

This speech was given as part of Yale Law School's Global Consitutionalism Seminar 2012, convening on the occasion of the Centennial of Carnegie Corporation, New York, and of the Peace Palace, The Hague, and celebrating Andrew Carnegie's vision of international justice. The four-day event was held at the Peace Palace in The Hague from 29…

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Added by Joel Rosenthal on September 25, 2012 at 5:09pm — No Comments

Ethics & International Affairs, Fall 2012 Issue

Ethics & International Affairs is pleased to announce the publishing of its fall 2012 issue. This issue features an essay by Ann Florini on the global governance of energy; articles by Janina Dill and Henry Shue on the…

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Added by Carnegie Council on September 18, 2012 at 10:42am — No Comments

From Revolution to Constitution

The latest commentary from Global Ethics Fellow Rami Khouri:

BEIRUT -- Mass demonstrations in Tahrir Square and street battles in Syria form the dramatic heart of the uprisings and revolutions that define many Arab lands these days, but the soul and the brain of the Arab world to come are being shaped in the epic battles now taking place to write new constitutions. As has…

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Added by Carnegie Council on August 24, 2012 at 1:01pm — No Comments

Universal Jurisdiction Revisited: An alternative to the International Criminal Court?

On July 1, the International Criminal Court (ICC) turned ten years old. This milestone prompted much analysis and some mixed reviews of the court's performance. The ICC recorded its first verdict in March 2012, but there are serious concerns about its procedure and efficiency, patchy…

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Added by Alexa van Sickle on July 5, 2012 at 5:30pm — No Comments

What’s More Important Than Human Rights?

As the owner of a fitness club, I have a unique opportunity to talk in depth with people about their health.  Good health is arguably the most important aspect of living a healthful life.  Despite this, most of us routinely fail to get the exercise we know we need.  The excuses are diverse: “I’m too tired,” “I’m too busy,” and the ever-popular, “I don’t have time.”  The problem with these…

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Added by Kathryn M. Coy on June 30, 2012 at 11:30am — No Comments

CARNEGIE COUNCIL LIVE: Global Rules, Local Rulers with Carnegie UK Trust (12:40 PM)

If you are having difficulties viewing the webcast, please click here.

Carnegie UK Trust presents original research on the relationship between advocacy groups, citizens, and international organizations that regulate trade, markets, and consumer policy.

To watch this and other Carnegie Council videos AFTER the event, go to our…

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Added by Carnegie Council on June 21, 2012 at 12:20pm — No Comments

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The Crack-Up: The 1919 Elaine Massacre & the Struggle to Remember, with Nan Woodruff

The massacre in rural Elaine, Arkansas was one of the most violent episodes of 1919's Red Summer of racist confrontations, but it also remains one of the least-known. In this talk with historian Ted Widmer, Penn State's Professor Nan Woodruff explains the causes and how it fits in to the post-World War I context. Why are people still reluctant to speak about this massacre? How should we remember this dark chapter in American history?

The Individual & the Collective, Politics, & the UN, with Jean-Marie Guéhenno

Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Jean-Marie Guéhenno, former head of United Nations peacekeeping operations, discusses the tensions between the individual and the collective in a world filled with political tension, pervasive surveillance, and fear of risk. What is the role of the UN in this environment? How can we avoid the violent upheavals that marked other transitional phases in humanity?

A Russian Take on the Kurds and U.S. Foreign Policy

A Russian defense news site declared the United States an "unreliable ally" after the the withdrawal of American troops from Northern Syria. Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev connects this characterization to the need for leaders to connect a specific policy action to a larger, understandable narrative for the American public.

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